Thursday, December 13, 2018

Electric Powertrains Are the Future. Will Fleets Be Ready?

 Many automakers are making a switch to producing battery-electric and hybrid electric vehicles across all vehicle classes. Image:Josh Bauer/NREL

Most readers of Government Fleet are seasoned professionals pursuing careers either in public fleet management or in corporate roles in support of public sector fleets. For a moment, however, put aside your current career history and aspirations and try to remember when you were a younger person, weighing career options and considering just what path to take.

The public fleet industry is on the threshold of a truly cosmic shift, and it’s quite possible that young people today are looking at our industry and questioning those options. We should, as those young people may be doing, consider what this shift will mean when it occurs.

The shift will be toward a predominance of electromotive powertrain technology and away from the internal combustion engine (ICE). Is it true that the demise of the ICE is greatly overstated, or, should we, like those young people still contemplating their career paths, be reading the tea leaves and presume they portend a very different future for us?

LEARN MORE AT: http://www.greenfleetmagazine.com/channel/electric/article/story/2018/03/electric-powertrains-are-the-future-will-fleets-be-ready.aspx

Monday, December 10, 2018

TRACTOR TRAILER SEMI SCALE SYSTEM ALL AIR SUSPENSION




The Vulcan all-digital air scale system for tractor / trailer combinations provides an accurate way to obtain axle and/or payload weights. Corrosion resistant, stainless steel air sensors provide a rugged and reliable solution well suited to meet the requirements of on-board trucking applications. Air sensors are altitude and temperature compensated to enhance performance and accuracy. Vulcan VSL electronics allow unlimited mixing of tractors and trailers without any adjustments.

Learn more at: http://www.vulcanscales.com/index.php/general-trucking/tractor-trailer-semi/


Friday, December 7, 2018

2018-2019 Tow Show Schedule

 Home


April 11 – 14, 2019
Florida Tow Show®
Hilton Orlando Buena Vista Palace, Orlando, FL.
Phone: 407-296-3316
April 18 – 19, 2019
North American Repossessors Summit hosted by American Recovery Association 
Omni Mandalay Hotel at Los Colinas, Irving, TX
TBD 2019
AT Showplace Las Vegas hosted by American Towman
Southpoint Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, NV
Phone:  800-732-3869
Web: atshowplace.com
May 17 – 18, 2018 
Towers Family Retreat hosted by the American Towing & Recovery Institute
Crown Reef Resort in Myrtle Beach, SC
Contact: Wes Wilburn
Phone: (910) 747-9000
TBD 
New Hampshire Tow & Trade Show  hosted by the New Hampshire Towing Association
Hampton Beach State Park, Hampton, NH
Phone: (603) 863-4206
Web: nhtowingassociation.org
TBD 2019 
35th Annual ESTRA Tow Show hosted by Empire State Towing & Recovery Association
Charles R. Wood Park, Lake George Village, NY
Contact: Melissa Perlow
Phone: (631) 728-7752
Web: estratowshow.com
June 1, 2019
Nebraska Tow Show hosted by the Professional Towers Association of Nebraska
CHI Health Center, Omaha, NE
Contact: Dana Adamy
Phone: (402) 890-6531
June 14 – 16, 2019
Wisconsin Towing Association Tow Show
Chula Vista Resort (608-254-8366), Wisconsin Dells, WI.
Contact; WTA Office
Phone: 608-833-8200, ext. 17
July 31 – August 2, 2019
Towing & Recovery Management Summit (hosted by Tow Times)
Capital Hilton, Washington D.C.
Contact: Brenda Faulman
Phone: (407) 936-2494
August 9 – 10, 2019
Southern Tow Expo hosted by Tow Professionals
Orange Beach Convention Center, Orange Beach, AL
Contact: Darian Weaver
Phone: 205-223-4548
Web: southerntowexpo.com
TBD 2019
AT Tow Expo Dallas/Fort Worth hosted by American Towman
Phone:  800-732-3869
Web: towexpodfw.com
TBD 2019
Pacific Northwest Tow Show presented by Towing & Recovery Association of Washington
Greater Tacoma Trade and Convention Center, Tacoma, WA
Contact: Peter Lukevich
Phone: 206-492-5032
Web: pacificnorthwesttowshow.com 
TBD 2019
North Carolina Tow Truck And Trade Show 
Greensboro Coliseum, Greensboro, NC
Contact: Elaine
Phone: (919) 876-0687
Web: nctowing.org/events
Sept. 26 – 29, 2019
Midwest Regional Tow Show Hosted By Towing and Recovery Association of Ohio
Great Wolf Lodge, Mason, OH
Phone: 513-831-7469
Oct 10 – 12, 2019
Tennessee Tow Show hosted by Tennessee Tow Truck Association and Tow Times
Chattanooga Convention Center  Chattanooga, TN
Contact: Brenda Faulman (Tow Times)
Phone: (407) 936-2494
Web: tennesseetowshow.com
Nov 2019
AT Exposition hosted by American Towman
Baltimore Convention Center, Baltimore, MD
Phone:  800-732-3869
Web: atexposition.com

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

California Trucking Schools

 TruckersReport.com logo

A survey conducted in the year 2008 revealed that trucking companies in the United States have more than 3.2 million vacancies. It was also estimated that by the year 2018, the number of vacancies in the US truck driving industry will increase by as much as 9%. These inspiring numbers motivated many people to join the country’s trucking industry. The scenario is the same in every state across the nation. People of the most populous state of the country, California, have also jumped on the bandwagon. The basic requirement for becoming a professional trucker in California is a commercial driver’s license. The process of becoming a professional truck driver in California goes like this: you will have to attend truck driver training in California, pass the CDL skills test to obtain your commercial driver’s license and start working as a professional trucker.

Learn more at: https://www.thetruckersreport.com/trucking-schools/california/

Saturday, December 1, 2018

Automation: The unstoppable force

But what will this mean for truck drivers?

automation

For transportation economist Noël Perry, the debate over the future of autonomous truck technology has already ended.

“It is an unstoppable force, no less unstoppable than the car killing the trolley car,” said Perry, who heads up consulting firm Transport Futures.

The reasoning behind his belief is simple: Automation will increase truck utilization to levels never before thought possible.

Learn more at: https://www.fleetowner.com/autonomous-vehicles/automation-unstoppable-force?NL=FO-06&Issue=FO-06_20181123_FO-06_790&sfvc4enews=42&cl=article_1_1&utm_rid=CPENT000004488230&utm_campaign=22069&utm_medium=email&elq2=fd41e15a5cea4ba4820df0e0db509ae0

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

Electric standby power saves fleet 80,000 gal. of diesel

 Golden State Foods idle reduction via SafeConnect standby power

Truck idling is one of the most common targets for cost reduction among fleets today. It burns fuel, racks up runtime and maintenance needs for engines, and produces harmful emissions—all of which could potentially be avoided, saving money and helping the environment at the same time.

COMPANY: Golden State Foods, Garner, NC

OPERATION: A multinational, diversified supplier to the quick-service restaurant and retail industries. Golden State has more than 7,000 employees worldwide and supplies more than 125,000 restaurants and stores on five continents from its 50 facilities. Its core businesses include processing liquid and dairy products, meat patties, and produce and providing related logistics services.

CHALLENGE: Fuel is burned, emissions are increased, and maintenance costs are incurred due to trucks idling engines to power refrigeration units.

Truck idling is one of the most common targets for cost reduction among fleets today. It burns fuel, racks up runtime and maintenance needs for engines, and produces harmful emissions—all of which could potentially be avoided, saving money and helping the environment at the same time.

But when you're distributing refrigerated food goods and using the engine to power reefer units, idling happens all the time. At Golden State Foods' distribution center in Garner, the company's 65 trucks were burning some 80,000 gal. of diesel each year to keep food cold as it was awaiting delivery runs. Taking an average cost of diesel of $3/gal., that's $240,000 just for the fuel alone, and that's not accounting for other associated costs.

It's not only a dilemma for Golden State Foods: according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), long-duration truck idling in the United States soaks up more than a billion gallons of fuel and creates 11 million tons of carbon dioxide emissions each year.  An hour of idling uses a gallon of fuel on average.

SOLUTION: Install SafeConnect standby power outlets to run truck refrigeration units at the depot on electric power instead.

Looking for an alternative, Golden State Foods turned to SafeConnect Systems, maker of hybrid transportation refrigeration units that can be powered either by diesel or electric power. SafeConnect has developed an electric standby system with a special circuit for safer operation at the high voltages required.

A total of 32 electric power outlets that SafeConnect installed will help Golden State Foods' trucks switch off, cutting costs and lowering emissions considerably while keeping food cold at the depot while en route to delivery.

"Incorporating renewable energy at all Golden State Foods facilities and fleets is a priority and part of our fundamental values and 2020 sustainability goals," said Gregg Tartlon, general manager of Golden State Foods' Garner facility. Even accounting for electricity costs to power the refrigeration units, the facility will come out well ahead with net savings.

"These new electric power outlets are estimated to save Garner nearly $110,000 a year, resulting in 80,000 gallons of fuel saved for our 65 trucks," Tartlon noted, adding there are now 15 Golden State Foods and subsidiary Quality Custom Distribution centers using this type of electric technology.

Bob Provencher, director of technology and sales at SafeConnect, pointed out that SafeConnect has installed its electric standby connection system for truck refrigeration units at more than 10 Golden State Foods distribution centers over the last three years.

The Golden State Foods electrification project in Garner was supported by funds from Duke Energy. The funds stem from a 2015 settlement between Duke Energy and EPA and environmental groups in a case dating back to 2000. This is now Duke's third project in North Carolina to use electric power to replace the need to idle truck engines.

"Duke Energy is a strong believer in the benefits of electrification for our industrial customers," said Clark Gillespy, senior vice president of economic development at Duke Energy.

He pointed to this latest project's social as well as cost-reduction benefits: "At Golden State Foods, truck idling will be lessened—saving money, lowering noise levels, and reducing air emissions," he noted.

 Source: https://www.fleetowner.com/running-green/electric-standby-power-saves-fleet-80000-gal-diesel?NL=FO-06&Issue=FO-06_20181123_FO-06_790&sfvc4enews=42&cl=article_2_1&utm_rid=CPENT000004488230&utm_campaign=22069&utm_medium=email&elq2=fd41e15a5cea4ba4820df0e0db509ae0

Sunday, November 25, 2018

5 Steps To Buying A Big Rig


When you decide to buy a truck there are some simple steps you can take to be sure you get the best bang for your buck. If you go into a truck purchase blindly, you are likely to pay too much and get much less than you hoped for.

1. Shop Around.

Truck dealers can only advertise in their own region. A truck dealership in Ohio is not allowed to advertise in California. But dealerships are allowed to sell trucks to customers in other regions if the customer contacts them. As you travel, grab some truck papers from different regions of the country and consider contacting dealers that are far from you. If you already know what make of truck you want, call around to dealers around the country.

2. Compare Apples to Apples.

If you are going to be ordering a new truck, ask for a price quote along with the specifications- this will be about 10 pages long. Compare the spec sheets from different dealers line for line. You may find that a salesman who gives you a lower price quote also skimped out on some of the options without mentioning that to you. If you find that a salesman's quote has inferior specs, tell them which ones you want changed and have them resend the specs and quote. ALWAYS read through the specs line by line- don't trust anything verbal. You may have to pay a chunk of change to receive the faxes from all these dealers, but at least you'll know you're comparing prices, not options.

3. Prioritize

If you are shopping for a used truck, it's unlikely that you will be able to find two trucks that are exactly alike. You won't be able to compare apples to apples like you would if you were buying a new truck. Make a list of the specifications that are most important to you. What make and model are you looking for? How old and roughly how many miles? What engine do you want? What transmission? What rears? Once you nail down those requirements, you may have to compromise on some of the options. Power windows, gauge packages, color. Most options can be changed if they are not to your liking. The things that matter most are the things that are permanent, but you will want to consider the less important options once you have narrowed it down to a few trucks.

4. Get a loan from your own bank.

If you have the dealership set up financing, they are likely to add "points" to your interest rate. There is nothing unethical about this- you are, after all, using their resources to secure financing and they should be compensated for the work their employees do. But you need to decide if you are willing to pay the difference over the life of the loan. The bank may give you a 10% interest rate, but the dealer sets it up for 12% and will pocket the difference with each payment you make. Generally, the dealer will not disclose this information. However, you need to be aware that you may be able to secure a lower interest rate on your own. Consider- a difference of 3% will save you hundreds of dollars each month. It's worth it to do the extra legwork on your own.

5. Make sure you can afford the truck.

There are a lot of owner-operator contracts out there. There are many more mediocre owner-operator contracts than there are lucrative ones. Before you take on the risks involved with owning a truck, make sure you have a contract that can pay for it. Will you be pouring every dime you make back into the truck? Calculate the costs of fuel and maintenance and taxes. If you are a company driver, spend a few months putting your records on paper. Look at the bottom line- what will you have left after all your expenses? If you are not yet a driver, you will want to spend a couple of years driving a truck as a company driver before you decide to buy a truck on your own. Don't buy the lie that owner-operators with rates twice as high as company drivers are making twice as much. They may not even be making the same amount once you figure in all the expenses.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Suzanne_Roquemore