Monday, April 12, 2021

Cummins On Highway Electronic Engine Features - Load Based Speed Control


Load Based Speed Control or LBSC is an electronic feature that is programmable on the Cummins ISX15 and ISX12, and ISX12 G engines. LBSC encourages the driver to shift into the next gear as soon as possible and is active in all gears except the top two. LBSC turns off when applications are above 100,000 lbs GCVW, during tire scrub events, and when grades exceed 2%. To set up or adjust LBSC trim settings, download PowerSpec, a free computer application, and talk to your local Cummins representative to receive free licensing rights. For more information, visit the feature description section of http://cumminsengines.com/powerspec.

Friday, April 9, 2021

Preventable Accident Tips For Truckers That Really Work


Dave chats about some common sense ways to AVOID UNNECESSARY accidents, for truckers.... NEW DRIVERS AS WELL AS EXPERIENCED DRIVERS. - Move slowly and methodically at all times. -Adjust your speed according to weather/road conditions. - Be thorough and double check all that you do. - When picking up or delivering freight, get out and check out the area on foot. - Don't rely 100% on a spotter. - Use a paper map, exit guide and GPS and reference each of these to locate and plan your route. - Trip plan to avoid problems.
These tips aren't rocket science, but it's surprising how many drivers fail to adhere to these basic principles... new and experienced truck drivers.
Many accidents are avoidable. Such accidents can scar your CDL and possibly ruin your driving career.

If you're a truck driver, or interested in becoming a truck driver, be sure to subscribe to our Smart Trucking Channel for tips and advice which may be useful in your trucking career. Smart Trucking 

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR CHANNEL! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDLY...

Monday, April 5, 2021

Fleet Drivers: Are You Getting Enough Sleep?


As more businesses resume operations, and more vehicle fleets are getting back on the road, it is important to remember that an alert fleet driver is a safe fleet driver. While no one is immune to drowsy driving, there are steps you can take to help ensure you get enough sleep.

Across North America, this week and next have been designated Drowsy Driving Prevention Week in the US and Canada respectively. A recent study by the National Safety Council revealed that almost 50% of Americans operate their vehicles while too tired to do so. This is a troubling statistic, especially considering the NSC has determined that driving with less than five hours sleep has the same accident risk as driving drunk. In other words, drowsy driving is impaired driving and half of us are driving around without enough sleep!

When you don't get enough sleep, you are more likely to make bad decisions and take more risks. The effects of drowsy driving are staggering, with an estimated 100,000 accidents and 1,500 deaths caused by drowsy driving each year. In addition to the impact on loved ones and family members, driving drowsy results in close to $13 billion in losses per year in the US alone.

The COVID-19 pandemic has added to the problem. Many are struggling with additional stress caused by uncertainty and fear, which is preventing them from getting enough sleep. Neurologists are seeing a spike in patients with sleep disorders caused by COVID-19, and are calling this phenomenon “COVID-somnia.”

What do companies need to remember to prevent drowsy driving?

As more businesses resume operations, and more vehicle fleets are getting back on the road, it is important to remember that an alert fleet driver is a safe fleet driver. Employees may not have driven in a few months, they may be operating a different vehicle, or they may be new hires with little driving experience. Given these additional challenges, it is even more important that drivers are well-rested, alert, and fully aware of their surroundings.


Getting enough sleep is even more important depending on your work environment. Long-haul trucking with heavy loads for example, the sheer size and weight of the truck and cargo combined demands a focused, and alert driver. Similarly, getting enough sleep can be a challenge for others who work long hours, night shifts, or have a very early start time every morning.


The NSC has compiled a list of nine risk factors for driver fatigue, and a staggering 97% of drivers surveyed had at least one of these factors which include: shift work, late working hours, sleep loss, and physically or cognitively demanding work. While no one is immune to drowsy driving, there are steps you can take to help ensure you get enough sleep.

What can fleet drivers do to stay healthy and well-rested during the pandemic and in “normal” times?

The best way to ensure you are well-rested and ready to drive, is to get enough sleep. So how much is enough? The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) recommends that adults get at least between seven and eight hours of sleep every day. Our bodies crave sleep - not getting enough of it can also increase the risk of having high blood pressure, heart disease and lead to other medical problems.

Here are some great tips from NHLBI and UC Davis Health that will help you get a better sleep:

Sleep and wake at consistent times every day, including weekends. Establishing a regular sleep rhythm can make sure your body knows when to stay awake.

Maintain your daily routine when working remotely. Wake up, get dressed and eat breakfast as if you were heading to work. The same goes for after work, try to eat dinner and carry out your evening tasks on a regular schedule.

Establish one hour of quiet time before sleeping. Avoid loud music, strenuous exercise, and bright screens (e.g., smartphone, TV, laptop) and make sure your sleeping area is as dark as possible.

Stay away from heavy meals, alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine right before bed. All of these things will disrupt your sleep.

Use caution with sleep aids. Over-the-counter sleep aids can leave you drowsy the next morning and prescription drugs can lead to dependence.

Stay active - exercising on a daily basis, especially outdoors, can help maintain a more regular sleep rhythm.

Don't take naps - a short nap is ok, but anything over 20 minutes will disrupt your sleep cycle.

Take a hot bath or practice relaxation techniques - such as meditating before going to bed.

If you are already on the road, and feeling a little drowsy, there are a number of things you can do to help stay alert. The National Sleep Foundation recommends the following:

Drive in two-hour shifts with resting stops in between. If you begin to feel drowsy while driving or find yourself dozing, pull over and park as soon as possible to take a short nap.

Drink a caffeinated beverage. While caffeine is not a substitute for sleep, a caffeinated beverage can help you feel more awake after a short nap.

Travel with a passenger who is fully awake. Having someone who can help keep you awake or alert you if you’re drowsy can help prevent an accident. If possible, drive in shifts with your passenger.

Getting enough sleep every day is essential. It's also easier said than done, especially considering the psychological stress that COVID-19 has caused for so many of us. The best thing you can do is try and maintain a regular routine, exercise regularly, and avoid consuming stimulants before bedtime. We hope these tips will help you stay alert and focused on the road. Drive safely!

By Element Fleet Safety - 

By the Element Safety Team

Source: https://www.elementfleet.com/resources/blog/fleet-drivers-are-you-getting-enough-sleep


Saturday, April 3, 2021

It takes the whole company to make a fleet safe


Changing fleet culture to prioritize safety along with adding advanced technologies to commercial vehicles can have the biggest effect on turning a “high risk” fleet into a safe fleet, according to a recent study.

One single fix can improve safety performances of a fleet. But making comprehensive adjustments can take a fleet from “high risk” to safe, according to a recent study by the National Surface Transportation Safety Center for Excellence (NSTSCE), that shows changes throughout a company can reduce crashes and strengthen safety.

Follow this link for the rest of the story: https://www.fleetowner.com/safety/article/21704179/it-takes-the-whole-company-to-make-a-fleet-safe

Wednesday, March 31, 2021

Sunday, March 28, 2021

NACV Show 2021: America’s Premier Commercial Fleet Event Set for Atlanta September 28-30

Event Partners and Sponsors to Feature Multiple Education Sessions on Electrification, Last Mile Shipping and More


ATLANTA – Hannover Fairs USA (HFUSA) and Newcom Business Media, organizers of the North American Commercial Vehicle Show (NACV Show), announced today that America’s premier commercial fleet event will be held on September 28-30, 2021, showcasing again the innovative spirit of the industry while further improving the value and ROI for attending fleets and exhibiting companies alike. The NACV Show 2021 will allow attendees to engage with global exhibitors to experience emerging technologies from battery operated trucks to electric trailers, cutting-edge maintenance solutions and components.

Education: Electric Trucks, Last Mile and More

NACV Show 2021 builds on the 2019 event’s success with the addition of multiple education sessions. One such highlight of this year’s event will be the North American Council for Freight Efficiency (NACFE) and RMI presentation of the results of Run on Less – Electric, a three-week roadshow that will showcase electric trucks in everyday operation. This culmination of the Run on Less – Electric program will feature feedback and analysis from the 10 dedicated study drivers and educational sessions from the OEMs, technology providers, fleet management and shipping companies participating in this year’s study.

“NACFE is excited to again partner with the NACV Show for the finale of our upcoming Run on Less – Electric demonstration. As we did in 2017 and 2019, this third Run will now allow us to share benefits and challenges that pioneering companies are experiencing with early deployment of battery electric trucks. Those pioneers will be with us in Atlanta to help share their knowledge and experience with attendees so they can learn directly from them,” said Mike Roeth, Executive Director of the North American Council for Freight Efficiency.

Also, in the electric truck space, attendees will hear from today’s thought leaders and technology innovators who will address electrification opportunities and challenges, including how to plan for and transition to electric fleets. Speakers will discuss the latest data about how the industry is paving the way to zero emissions and highlight real world case studies about what electric vehicles will look like in a variety of scenarios.

Freightwaves’ “Last Mile” education program will also be part of this year’s lineup. This complimentary education for all NACV Show 2021 fleet attendees will include content from OEMs and fleets addressing today’s challenges and opportunities in Last Mile shipping, particularly the unique challenges and opportunities created over the last 18 months.

“I couldn’t be prouder of our team in the development of this year’s NACV Show event,” said Ed Nichols, Vice President of the NACV Show. “Through months of research and interviews the team has really developed a ‘fleet first’ event, addressing the educational needs of our attending fleets, not only topically, but in the format and from the perspectives they want and need.”

Nichols also shared that the list of partners and content will continue to grow. “We encourage attendees to stay tuned for updates on this year’s education program, which is specifically geared towards helping them immediately improve and build their business,” added Nichols.

Safely Gathering in September

HFUSA continues to work closely with NACV Show partners and stakeholders, local and state authorities and the Georgia World Congress Center (GWCC) on implementing safety protocols for September’s event.

The GWCC is a GBAC STAR™ accredited facility, which has established and maintained a cleaning, disinfection and infectious disease prevention program to minimize risks associated with infectious agents like COVID-19. As an accredited facility, GWCC has put in place the proper cleaning protocols, disinfection techniques, and work practices to combat biohazards and infectious disease; and employs highly informed cleaning professionals who are trained for outbreak and infectious disease preparation and response. View the GWCC’s extensive plan of enhanced safety measures and operational changes at www.gwcca.org/returnplan.

“Hannover Fairs USA and Newcom Business Media are dedicated to ensuring a safe and successful event for all involved. We are developing and will continually communicate the details of our safety plan to the NACV Show community,” said Nichols.

Registration to attend NACV Show 2021 will open on March 22. For more information, please go to

www.nacvshow.com

About The North American Commercial Vehicle Show

The North American Commercial Vehicle Show (NACV Show) www.nacvshow.com is a B2B exhibition focused on fleet decision makers and key influencers in the commercial vehicle industry. The NACV Show has been designated a Gold 100 Awards honoree by Trade Show Executive, a top (trade show) industry publication honoring the largest and most accomplished trade shows of the year. Leading truck & trailer manufacturers and commercial vehicle parts, technology and components suppliers will demonstrate their latest product offerings and fleet technology innovations during the NACV Show 2021 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta from September 28-30.

Thursday, March 25, 2021

The importance of fuel economy


Getting good fuel economy is important regardless of the price of fuel, but some fleets take their eyes off the prize when fuel prices dip. Here are 10 ways to improve a fleet’s fuel economy.

According to the American Transportation Research Institute’s An Analysis of the Operational Costs of Trucking: 2020 Update, fuel represents 24% of a fleets average marginal operating cost. To put it another way, that $0.50 per gallon increase equates to an additional $7,000 per truck per year. You can do the math from here to figure out what that number is fleet wide. It’s going to be a big number.

Learn more at: https://www.fleetowner.com/industry-perspectives/ideaxchange/article/21158063/the-importance-of-fuel-economy