Monday, April 12, 2021

Cummins On Highway Electronic Engine Features - Load Based Speed Control


Load Based Speed Control or LBSC is an electronic feature that is programmable on the Cummins ISX15 and ISX12, and ISX12 G engines. LBSC encourages the driver to shift into the next gear as soon as possible and is active in all gears except the top two. LBSC turns off when applications are above 100,000 lbs GCVW, during tire scrub events, and when grades exceed 2%. To set up or adjust LBSC trim settings, download PowerSpec, a free computer application, and talk to your local Cummins representative to receive free licensing rights. For more information, visit the feature description section of http://cumminsengines.com/powerspec.

Friday, April 9, 2021

Preventable Accident Tips For Truckers That Really Work


Dave chats about some common sense ways to AVOID UNNECESSARY accidents, for truckers.... NEW DRIVERS AS WELL AS EXPERIENCED DRIVERS. - Move slowly and methodically at all times. -Adjust your speed according to weather/road conditions. - Be thorough and double check all that you do. - When picking up or delivering freight, get out and check out the area on foot. - Don't rely 100% on a spotter. - Use a paper map, exit guide and GPS and reference each of these to locate and plan your route. - Trip plan to avoid problems.
These tips aren't rocket science, but it's surprising how many drivers fail to adhere to these basic principles... new and experienced truck drivers.
Many accidents are avoidable. Such accidents can scar your CDL and possibly ruin your driving career.

If you're a truck driver, or interested in becoming a truck driver, be sure to subscribe to our Smart Trucking Channel for tips and advice which may be useful in your trucking career. Smart Trucking 

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR CHANNEL! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDLY...

Monday, April 5, 2021

Fleet Drivers: Are You Getting Enough Sleep?


As more businesses resume operations, and more vehicle fleets are getting back on the road, it is important to remember that an alert fleet driver is a safe fleet driver. While no one is immune to drowsy driving, there are steps you can take to help ensure you get enough sleep.

Across North America, this week and next have been designated Drowsy Driving Prevention Week in the US and Canada respectively. A recent study by the National Safety Council revealed that almost 50% of Americans operate their vehicles while too tired to do so. This is a troubling statistic, especially considering the NSC has determined that driving with less than five hours sleep has the same accident risk as driving drunk. In other words, drowsy driving is impaired driving and half of us are driving around without enough sleep!

When you don't get enough sleep, you are more likely to make bad decisions and take more risks. The effects of drowsy driving are staggering, with an estimated 100,000 accidents and 1,500 deaths caused by drowsy driving each year. In addition to the impact on loved ones and family members, driving drowsy results in close to $13 billion in losses per year in the US alone.

The COVID-19 pandemic has added to the problem. Many are struggling with additional stress caused by uncertainty and fear, which is preventing them from getting enough sleep. Neurologists are seeing a spike in patients with sleep disorders caused by COVID-19, and are calling this phenomenon “COVID-somnia.”

What do companies need to remember to prevent drowsy driving?

As more businesses resume operations, and more vehicle fleets are getting back on the road, it is important to remember that an alert fleet driver is a safe fleet driver. Employees may not have driven in a few months, they may be operating a different vehicle, or they may be new hires with little driving experience. Given these additional challenges, it is even more important that drivers are well-rested, alert, and fully aware of their surroundings.


Getting enough sleep is even more important depending on your work environment. Long-haul trucking with heavy loads for example, the sheer size and weight of the truck and cargo combined demands a focused, and alert driver. Similarly, getting enough sleep can be a challenge for others who work long hours, night shifts, or have a very early start time every morning.


The NSC has compiled a list of nine risk factors for driver fatigue, and a staggering 97% of drivers surveyed had at least one of these factors which include: shift work, late working hours, sleep loss, and physically or cognitively demanding work. While no one is immune to drowsy driving, there are steps you can take to help ensure you get enough sleep.

What can fleet drivers do to stay healthy and well-rested during the pandemic and in “normal” times?

The best way to ensure you are well-rested and ready to drive, is to get enough sleep. So how much is enough? The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) recommends that adults get at least between seven and eight hours of sleep every day. Our bodies crave sleep - not getting enough of it can also increase the risk of having high blood pressure, heart disease and lead to other medical problems.

Here are some great tips from NHLBI and UC Davis Health that will help you get a better sleep:

Sleep and wake at consistent times every day, including weekends. Establishing a regular sleep rhythm can make sure your body knows when to stay awake.

Maintain your daily routine when working remotely. Wake up, get dressed and eat breakfast as if you were heading to work. The same goes for after work, try to eat dinner and carry out your evening tasks on a regular schedule.

Establish one hour of quiet time before sleeping. Avoid loud music, strenuous exercise, and bright screens (e.g., smartphone, TV, laptop) and make sure your sleeping area is as dark as possible.

Stay away from heavy meals, alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine right before bed. All of these things will disrupt your sleep.

Use caution with sleep aids. Over-the-counter sleep aids can leave you drowsy the next morning and prescription drugs can lead to dependence.

Stay active - exercising on a daily basis, especially outdoors, can help maintain a more regular sleep rhythm.

Don't take naps - a short nap is ok, but anything over 20 minutes will disrupt your sleep cycle.

Take a hot bath or practice relaxation techniques - such as meditating before going to bed.

If you are already on the road, and feeling a little drowsy, there are a number of things you can do to help stay alert. The National Sleep Foundation recommends the following:

Drive in two-hour shifts with resting stops in between. If you begin to feel drowsy while driving or find yourself dozing, pull over and park as soon as possible to take a short nap.

Drink a caffeinated beverage. While caffeine is not a substitute for sleep, a caffeinated beverage can help you feel more awake after a short nap.

Travel with a passenger who is fully awake. Having someone who can help keep you awake or alert you if you’re drowsy can help prevent an accident. If possible, drive in shifts with your passenger.

Getting enough sleep every day is essential. It's also easier said than done, especially considering the psychological stress that COVID-19 has caused for so many of us. The best thing you can do is try and maintain a regular routine, exercise regularly, and avoid consuming stimulants before bedtime. We hope these tips will help you stay alert and focused on the road. Drive safely!

By Element Fleet Safety - 

By the Element Safety Team

Source: https://www.elementfleet.com/resources/blog/fleet-drivers-are-you-getting-enough-sleep


Saturday, April 3, 2021

It takes the whole company to make a fleet safe


Changing fleet culture to prioritize safety along with adding advanced technologies to commercial vehicles can have the biggest effect on turning a “high risk” fleet into a safe fleet, according to a recent study.

One single fix can improve safety performances of a fleet. But making comprehensive adjustments can take a fleet from “high risk” to safe, according to a recent study by the National Surface Transportation Safety Center for Excellence (NSTSCE), that shows changes throughout a company can reduce crashes and strengthen safety.

Follow this link for the rest of the story: https://www.fleetowner.com/safety/article/21704179/it-takes-the-whole-company-to-make-a-fleet-safe

Wednesday, March 31, 2021

Sunday, March 28, 2021

NACV Show 2021: America’s Premier Commercial Fleet Event Set for Atlanta September 28-30

Event Partners and Sponsors to Feature Multiple Education Sessions on Electrification, Last Mile Shipping and More


ATLANTA – Hannover Fairs USA (HFUSA) and Newcom Business Media, organizers of the North American Commercial Vehicle Show (NACV Show), announced today that America’s premier commercial fleet event will be held on September 28-30, 2021, showcasing again the innovative spirit of the industry while further improving the value and ROI for attending fleets and exhibiting companies alike. The NACV Show 2021 will allow attendees to engage with global exhibitors to experience emerging technologies from battery operated trucks to electric trailers, cutting-edge maintenance solutions and components.

Education: Electric Trucks, Last Mile and More

NACV Show 2021 builds on the 2019 event’s success with the addition of multiple education sessions. One such highlight of this year’s event will be the North American Council for Freight Efficiency (NACFE) and RMI presentation of the results of Run on Less – Electric, a three-week roadshow that will showcase electric trucks in everyday operation. This culmination of the Run on Less – Electric program will feature feedback and analysis from the 10 dedicated study drivers and educational sessions from the OEMs, technology providers, fleet management and shipping companies participating in this year’s study.

“NACFE is excited to again partner with the NACV Show for the finale of our upcoming Run on Less – Electric demonstration. As we did in 2017 and 2019, this third Run will now allow us to share benefits and challenges that pioneering companies are experiencing with early deployment of battery electric trucks. Those pioneers will be with us in Atlanta to help share their knowledge and experience with attendees so they can learn directly from them,” said Mike Roeth, Executive Director of the North American Council for Freight Efficiency.

Also, in the electric truck space, attendees will hear from today’s thought leaders and technology innovators who will address electrification opportunities and challenges, including how to plan for and transition to electric fleets. Speakers will discuss the latest data about how the industry is paving the way to zero emissions and highlight real world case studies about what electric vehicles will look like in a variety of scenarios.

Freightwaves’ “Last Mile” education program will also be part of this year’s lineup. This complimentary education for all NACV Show 2021 fleet attendees will include content from OEMs and fleets addressing today’s challenges and opportunities in Last Mile shipping, particularly the unique challenges and opportunities created over the last 18 months.

“I couldn’t be prouder of our team in the development of this year’s NACV Show event,” said Ed Nichols, Vice President of the NACV Show. “Through months of research and interviews the team has really developed a ‘fleet first’ event, addressing the educational needs of our attending fleets, not only topically, but in the format and from the perspectives they want and need.”

Nichols also shared that the list of partners and content will continue to grow. “We encourage attendees to stay tuned for updates on this year’s education program, which is specifically geared towards helping them immediately improve and build their business,” added Nichols.

Safely Gathering in September

HFUSA continues to work closely with NACV Show partners and stakeholders, local and state authorities and the Georgia World Congress Center (GWCC) on implementing safety protocols for September’s event.

The GWCC is a GBAC STAR™ accredited facility, which has established and maintained a cleaning, disinfection and infectious disease prevention program to minimize risks associated with infectious agents like COVID-19. As an accredited facility, GWCC has put in place the proper cleaning protocols, disinfection techniques, and work practices to combat biohazards and infectious disease; and employs highly informed cleaning professionals who are trained for outbreak and infectious disease preparation and response. View the GWCC’s extensive plan of enhanced safety measures and operational changes at www.gwcca.org/returnplan.

“Hannover Fairs USA and Newcom Business Media are dedicated to ensuring a safe and successful event for all involved. We are developing and will continually communicate the details of our safety plan to the NACV Show community,” said Nichols.

Registration to attend NACV Show 2021 will open on March 22. For more information, please go to

www.nacvshow.com

About The North American Commercial Vehicle Show

The North American Commercial Vehicle Show (NACV Show) www.nacvshow.com is a B2B exhibition focused on fleet decision makers and key influencers in the commercial vehicle industry. The NACV Show has been designated a Gold 100 Awards honoree by Trade Show Executive, a top (trade show) industry publication honoring the largest and most accomplished trade shows of the year. Leading truck & trailer manufacturers and commercial vehicle parts, technology and components suppliers will demonstrate their latest product offerings and fleet technology innovations during the NACV Show 2021 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta from September 28-30.

Thursday, March 25, 2021

The importance of fuel economy


Getting good fuel economy is important regardless of the price of fuel, but some fleets take their eyes off the prize when fuel prices dip. Here are 10 ways to improve a fleet’s fuel economy.

According to the American Transportation Research Institute’s An Analysis of the Operational Costs of Trucking: 2020 Update, fuel represents 24% of a fleets average marginal operating cost. To put it another way, that $0.50 per gallon increase equates to an additional $7,000 per truck per year. You can do the math from here to figure out what that number is fleet wide. It’s going to be a big number.

Learn more at: https://www.fleetowner.com/industry-perspectives/ideaxchange/article/21158063/the-importance-of-fuel-economy


Friday, March 19, 2021

Safe Driving Series | Ford Trucks | Pre-Driving Safety | Episode 1


Be sure to follow these steps to keep both you and your truck safe! #SharingTheLoad #FordTrucks

Be sure to follow these steps to keep both you and your truck safe! #SharingTheLoad #FordTrucks

Tuesday, March 16, 2021

Guide To Engine & Transmission Oil Coolers

Upgrading engine and transmission cooling systems is cheap insurance for preventing overheating issues

Gas or diesel, two-wheel-drive or four, today’s pickups and SUVs are remarkable vehicles. They are much more comfortable than those of yesteryear, their engines are making a lot more power with better fuel economy, and the transmissions are velvet smooth.

Cooling systems are also improving with each new model, as well. In fact, today’s new pickups are far more advanced than those found back five years.

That’s because every year the vehicle manufacturers drivetrain engineering teams take their new models to the desert Southwest in mid-summer, load them to the maximum trailer and gross combined ratings, then drive them up the steepest grades in triple-digit heat time and time again.

Such extreme testing is done to make sure the factory cooling systems are capable of sustaining operating temperatures within the safe working zones for both engine oils and transmission fluids.

OLDER TRUCK COOLING UPGRADES

But if your fleet is using older pickups, or buying used ones that are 5- 10-years old and refurbishing them for heavy-duty towing use, you need to take a close look at the cooling systems.

By: Bruce Smith (Hard Working Trucks)

Learn more at: https://www.hardworkingtrucks.com/trucks/pickups/article/15044678/guide-to-engine-transmission-oil-coolers

Saturday, March 13, 2021

Smart Fleet Strategies to Manage Tolling


The acceleration of the transition to all-electronic tolling confronts fleets with added practical and cost considerations.

It could be said, if glibly so, that where trucks roll, tolls climb. At best, tolls are a necessary evil. Certainly, when truckers digitally fork over, say, $30 to cross a major bridge – plus another $11 or $12 to pay that toll by mail (via license-plate capture) – they expect in return to drive over a safe and well-maintained roadway.

The American Transportation Research Institute analyzed toll-system revenue in a 2020 research paper (see 'Tolling by the Numbers' at the end of the article). In the report’s foreword, ATRI sharply states the politics that can envelop tolling – and the sheer inevitability of this revenue driver: “Trucking is often a target revenue source for those states that need money to close funding gaps. This is often an easy political decision, since truck tolls are charged to businesses, not individuals or voters. Likewise, trucks often have no choice but to pay a toll due to lack of alternative routes.”

Learn more at: https://www.truckinginfo.com/10138481/smart-strategies-for-managing-tolling


Wednesday, March 10, 2021

Preventable Accident Tips For Truckers That Really Work


Dave chats about some common sense ways to AVOID UNNECESSARY accidents, for truckers.... NEW DRIVERS AS WELL AS EXPERIENCED DRIVERS. - Move slowly and methodically at all times. -Adjust your speed according to weather/road conditions. - Be thorough and double check all that you do. - When picking up or delivering freight, get out and check out the area on foot. - Don't rely 100% on a spotter. - Use a paper map, exit guide and GPS and reference each of these to locate and plan your route. - Trip plan to avoid problems.
These tips aren't rocket science, but it's surprising how many drivers fail to adhere to these basic principles... new and experienced truck drivers.
Many accidents are avoidable. Such accidents can scar your CDL and possibly ruin your driving career.

If you're a truck driver, or interested in becoming a truck driver, be sure to subscribe to our Smart Trucking Channel for tips and advice which may be useful in your trucking career. Smart Trucking 

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR CHANNEL! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDLY...

Sunday, March 7, 2021

Tongue Weight Safety Demonstration


Proper trailer tongue weight improves the vehicle and trailer towing experience by improving performance. Not enough tongue weight or force on the hitch/tow ball causes an increase in trailer sway from side to side, making it difficult to control. Conversely, too much tongue weight or force on the hitch/tow ball could overload the rear tires of the towing vehicle, pushing the rear end of the vehicle around. This could also negatively affect the vehicle handling. Performance is impaired as you might not be able to go around corners and curves properly, and your vehicle may not stop quickly enough when you press the brake pedal.

The Weigh Safe Drop Hitch effectively measures the tongue weight of your towing load, improving the vehicle tow load balance and performance.

Thursday, March 4, 2021

RPM & Fuel Economy - Driver Training for On-Highway Heavy-Duty Truck Engines


Driver Training for On-Highway Heavy-Duty Truck Engines – Part 5 of 13 in a series of chapters from the Cummins On-Highway Heavy-Duty Truck Engine Driver Training Video Series updated in 2015. This segment discusses the effect RPM has on fuel economy.

Monday, March 1, 2021

Health and Safety Tips for Commercial Van Drivers



Health and safety. It is a number one priority while at work. And for tradesmen and commercial van drivers especially, now is the time to be extra careful while on the job. Follow our health and safety guidelines to ensure your commercial van stays clean and sanitary.

Keep the Air Fresh
Ensure that the air in your cab and cargo space is constantly moving, and not staying stagnant in your vehicle for long periods of time. One product that helps with this, is a Flettner vent. Installed on the roof of the commercial van, it sucks in fresh air as you drive while forcing the stale air out. This lowers the chance of germs settling on surfaces, reducing the risk of sickness.

Put Up a Barrier for Yourself
For commercial vans designed to carry passengers or materials that may be contagious, it is a good idea to put up a barrier to protect you. Composite safety partitions for cargo vans are a great option. Their tight fit to the van walls prevent germs from seeping into the cab while you drive. For smaller passenger vans, a clear plexiglass shield offers just as much protection and also allows the driver and passengers to see and hear each other clearly.

Clean Your Work Space Regularly
Giving your commercial van a quick clean, as often as required by company guidelines or government regulations, is a good way to rid yourself of germs and bacteria. However sometimes it can be difficult to wash the things you touch the most; your seat for example. That’s why we suggest Seat Covers. Sturdy and fitted, they are also removable which means you can throw them in the washing machine as needed.

Keep Protective Equipment Close
Hand sanitizers, gloves, masks… these are essential items to be carrying around in this current time. However, these are relatively small items which means they can be easily lost in the equipment of a commercial van. The solution to this is the 3-in-1 Sanitizer Caddy. This aluminum holder mounts anywhere in your van and stores all the essential items you need when coming into contact with other people.

Here at Ranger Design, your health and safety is top priority. We have designed these products to provide you with a way to keep your commercial van sanitary while on the job. Learn more on how to better protect yourself with partitions.


Learn about all Ranger Design products at: https://rangerdesign.com/




Friday, February 26, 2021

What To Keep In Your Truck or Car


Mickey shares his Truck EDC setup. Includes a medical kit from D-Dey Response Group, security best, battery jumper, proper vehicle jack, outdoor boots, snacks and much more... F150 Truck Cover by Diamondback.

by: Carry Trainer




Tuesday, February 23, 2021

Keeping Your Car (and Truck) Sensors Clean | Consumer Reports


Today's cars come with cutting edge technology designed to help keep you safe. Consumer Reports' expert explains how these revolutionary innovations can stop working with one simple thing: dirt.

Saturday, February 20, 2021

Kenworth Trucks Factory - How american trucks are made


Kenworth Trucks Factory - How American trucks are made Today, Kenworth trucks are built at assembly plants in Renton, Wash., Chillicothe, Ohio, and Ste. Therese, Quebec, and are available with PACCAR MX-13 engines assembled at the PACCAR Engine Company plant in Columbus, Miss.

Wednesday, February 17, 2021

How to back up an RV / Trailer "tail swing


The most common piece of advice that is given to new RV owners is to go out to a parking lot and practice backing up around cones. That is good and all but HOW should you setup the cones??? The maneuvers in this video are setup to teach control of the trailer, and build confidence in the driver. The best drivers are confident and relaxed. This link shows diagrams of how to setup each maneuver. Yes these are the same backing maneuvers used to test CDL drivers. If new truck drivers can parallel park a semi truck, YOU can parallel park an RV. http://bigrigcareer.com/cdl-skills-te...

Sunday, February 14, 2021

Top 5 Work Truck Safety & Security Trends


With a pulse on the customer needs and innovation in the work truck sector, James Muiter, Product Line Manager at Reading Truck Group, shares his top five industry trends on safety and security.

  1. Operator safety. Employers are carefully considering how to keep their operators injury-free, so avoiding accidents around the truck is just as important as on the road.  Proactive measures on a work truck can include installing safety steps and grips so that the operator can maintain “three points of contact” at all times when entering and exiting the vehicle.  At Reading, we’ve begun to see these concerns migrate from the very largest fleet operators and governments, into corporations and vocational fleet buyers.
  2. Visibility. Keeping the truck and its surroundings well-lit and visible helps protect workers from accidents on the side of the road and keeps crews productive when they’re working after sundown, especially in the winter months.
  3. 360° coverage. Chassis OEMs are bringing safety innovations like 360° cameras, and accident-avoidance technologies like collision warning, automatic emergency braking, adaptive cruise control and blindspot monitoring, which used to be only on luxury cars, into the commercial truck segment.  For example, every Ford Transit is now shipping with lane-departure warning and forward-collision warning camera systems.
  4. Securing tools and gear. A typical work truck now provides at least two layers of ‘locking’ protection.  Compartment doors will use power locks or three-point locking for additional points of contact and pry-proofing.  And these measures can be augmented with a “bar lock” or master locking feature, where a single padlock can secure all of the compartment doors to keep tools and equipment safe.  Additionally, Reading’s remote keyless entry locking system, called Latch-Matic, can now be integrated with the power locks on the chassis.  A driver can now lock and unlock both the body and chassis with a single key-fob.  Using just the chassis fob, for example on a Ford Super Duty or Ford Transit, gives our customers the convenience they have been asking for.  
  5. Ergonomics. For better ergonomics, handles and steps are no longer considered a special add-in, they’re becoming a standard offering across the board.  As an example, fixed steps that don’t have to be manually unfolded by the operator will help meet evolving safety requirements and might even lower insurance costs.

By James Muiter, Product Line Manager, Reading Truck Group as published in Fordpros magazine




Wednesday, February 10, 2021

Peterbilt's New Model 579 Walk-Around


In this video, Jacob White, Director of Product Marketing, highlights the features, advantages and benefits of the New Model 579. Features covered include exterior design and aero features as well as the interior of the cab and sleeper, including the digital display. This is the official YouTube Channel of Peterbilt Motors Company, a division of PACCAR Inc. Visit us at www.peterbilt.com.

Sunday, February 7, 2021

Isuzu Truck Factory - Production


Isuzu Truck Factory - Production Light and Medium Duty Trucks Production facilities and manufacturing truck plants are in South Africa, Kairouan (Tunisie), Sri City, Andhra Pradesh (India), U.S. plant in Janesville, and in UK. 0:00 Frame and chassis assembly 3:05 Cab Welding 3:37 Paint 3:53 Assembly Cab 5:05 Instalation Cab 5:24 Final Assembly 5:52 Testing https://www.youtube.com/c/LikeMoto

Friday, February 5, 2021

Tuesday, February 2, 2021

Need a Lift? Big or Small - A&T Road Service Gets You There!

Ever wonder how a Big Truck Breakdown gets to the Garage?


This is How!


When Trailer Tractors Break Down and Need a Tow, A & T Road Service has the equipment to get you there! A & T Road Service, the "Ambulance Service for Trucks."

Learn more at: https://www.truckmobilerepair.com/

Saturday, January 30, 2021

Ask An Expert - Towing and Hauling Tips with Mark Hellwig


Hellwig Suspension Products CEO, Mark Hellwig has been in the load and sway control business his whole life. Over the years he has learned a few things about towing and hauling.

Mark shares a few tips and pieces of advice for proper and safe towing and hauling in this video.

Wednesday, January 27, 2021

Safety Tools Truck Drivers Need to Have

Garmin - DriveAssist 51 LMT-S 5" GPS with Built-In Camera and Bluetooth, Lifetime Map and Traffic Updates - Black

Truck drivers perform an important but dangerous work. Safety then should always be a top priority whether on the road or loading and unloading the boxes and crates they're required to deliver. The task proves to be more tiresome particularly if the driver works alone with no companion to help in the loading and unloading aspect.

In the U.S., trucks are among the vehicles that often get involved in road accidents. In 2000 alone, the Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration revealed that more than 450,000 big trucks encountered accidents.

Currently, there are approximately 3.5 million truck drivers in the U.S. handling different types and sizes of trucks. These people should have undergone the necessary CDL or commercial driver's license training that is one of the important qualifications considered by companies when hiring truck drivers.

Trucks need to have the right safety tools that will allow them to fix problems during their travel and navigation devices to guide them when locating their destination. For those who transport huge boxes, they also need to have the proper equipment such as levers for loading and unloading purposes.

GPS navigation device - This is a very important tool that helps drivers locate the place they're going to. With its small monitor, drivers will be able to view a map of their area of destination. There are also units that have voice features and tell drivers the streets they can take.

Vehicle backup camera - As it's hard to monitor a truck's blind spots, having a backup camera is very helpful. This is normally attached on the top part of the license plate and is connected to a monitor positioned on the dashboard or sun visor. With this tool, a driver can easily check what's behind the truck while backing up or moving along the highways before changing lanes or making turns. It's an affordable device that's a must today for all types of vehicles.

Jack and tire iron - You never know when you'll get a flat tire or your tires experience low pressure the reason why having a jack in your truck is very important. The CDL training course will teach you the right way of changing tires so this should not be a problem in case you encounter flat tires during your travel.

Tire chains - Also known as snow chains, these devices are meant to provide traction when you're driving through snow and ice. These are fitted in the drive wheels of the vehicle and are required by transportation authorities during snowy conditions. Usually, they are sold in pairs. When these are in place, you have also to reduce your speed to ensure the safety of your vehicle.

Other than these devices, a truck driver traveling on long hauls should also bring along water, food and extra clothing. There are times when you need to travel through desert areas or places wherein there are no restaurants along the highways so it's always best to be ready.

Getting your CDL training should provide you with the appropriate knowledge on truck driving safety and the tools you need to have while traveling. So never ignore its value for it will benefit you for the long term.

By

For great information on CDL training, visit Truck-School.com
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kalyan_Kumar

Sunday, January 24, 2021

At A&T Road Service, we not only do we provide reliable 24-hour road service; We Also Provide::

  • In-House TOWING
  • Fully Equipped Mobile Repair Units
  • Tire Replacement
  • Load Adjustments
  • Welding
  • Fuel Delivery
  • Lock-Outs
  • Vehicle Storage
  • Hydraulics
  • DOT & BIT Inspections
  • Crane Inspections
  • Glass Replacement
  • Vehicle Rentals
  • Liftgate Repairs and Service
  • Tens of Thousands of Parts In-Stock
We are centrally located in Fairfield CA which is approximately 45 miles from San Francisco or Sacramento and about 50 miles from Stockton. We regularly service Fairfield, Vallejo, Rio Vista, Napa, Vacaville, Travis AFB, Winters, Dixon, Davis, Benicia, St. Helena, Calistoga, Suisun City, Green Valley, Crockett, Hercules, San Pablo, Richmond, Concord, Walnut Creek, Martinez, Boyes Hot Springs, Sonoma, Allendale, Cordelia, Pleasant Hill, Pittsburg, Antioch, Novato, American Canyon, Truck Scales and much more. We’ve even gone as far as San Jose, the South Bay and the Peninsula because we always answer the phone 24/7. Solano County is our home turf, but readily service Napa County, Yolo County, Contra Costa County, Sonoma County, Sacramento County, and San Joaquin County, Alameda County and Marin County. We also have been known to travel to San Francisco County, Santa Clara County and San Mateo County. In fact, if you need immediate service, we will travel where ever we need to in order to take care of your problem. We are at your service and we mean that sincerely.

A&T “Mobile” Truck Road Service is a part of the BIT Inspection Program and is able to do inspections for you on-site. We are DOT Certified and all BIT inspections are performed utilizing DOT/BIT Inspectors. A&T “Mobile” Truck Road Service meets all requirements under Title 49 of the DOT Inspectors Guide.

You can find more information about the CalBit Program and the requirements at their website
Contact A&T Road Service at: 707- 427 - 1386

Need a tow? Call 1-800-434-1205


Thursday, January 21, 2021

Who Must Stop at Scales?


California's "Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Facilities" are commonly called weigh stations or truck scales. These facilities are operated by the California Highway Patrol (CHP), not by Caltrans. However, Caltrans receives many inquiries about weigh stations. This page is designed to answer some of those questions. The links provide access to the on-line California Vehicle Code (CVC).

CVC Section 2813 outlines who must stop at weigh stations and inspection stations:

2813. Every driver of a commercial vehicle shall stop and submit the vehicle to an inspection of the size, weight, equipment, and smoke emissions of the vehicle at any location where members of the California Highway Patrol are conducting tests and inspections of commercial vehicles and when signs are displayed requiring the stop. Every driver who fails or refuses to stop and submit the vehicle to an inspection when signs are displayed requiring that stop is guilty of a misdemeanor.

CVC Section 260 defines "commercial vehicle" (bolding added):

260. (a) A "commercial vehicle" is a motor vehicle of a type required to be registered under this code used or maintained for the transportation of persons for hire, compensation, or profit or designed, used, or maintained primarily for the transportation of property.

(b) Passenger vehicles which are not used for the transportation of persons for hire, compensation, or profit and housecars are not commercial vehicles. ...

(c) Any vanpool vehicle is not a commercial vehicle.

(d) ...

CVC Section 410 defines a "motor truck" (bolding added):

410. A "motor truck" or "motortruck" is a motor vehicle designed, used, or maintained primarily for the transportation of property.

CVC Section 471 defines "pickup truck" (bolding added):

471. A "pickup truck" is a motor truck with a manufacturer's gross vehicle weight rating of less than 11,500 pounds, an unladen weight of less than 8,001 pounds, and which is equipped with an open box-type bed not exceeding 9 feet in length. "Pickup truck" does not include a motor vehicle otherwise meeting the above definition, that is equipped with a bed-mounted storage compartment unit commonly called a "utility body."

Learn more at: https://dot.ca.gov/programs/traffic-operations/cvef/weigh-stations

Monday, January 18, 2021

Take a close look at a heavy Wrecker Truck


Before continuing work on my class 8 wrecker model project I thought I would get some good pictures of a real wrecker, especially the business end.

Thursday, January 14, 2021

PAYLOAD PROBLEMS: HOW MUCH CAN I (REALLY) TOW? RV Truck & Trailer


🚩Towing capacity is frequently misunderstood. The fact is there are so many acronyms and various factors based on the truck, it’s easy to get confused. To make things worst, the truck manufactures promote their highest possible tow rating for an entire class of truck and then put an asterisk that it only applies to a dually truck.

To know how much RV you can really tow, we must first address the limitations you’ll likely reach long before towing capacity. This video will break down GVWR, GCVWR, GAWR, UVW (dry weight), Payload and then Towing Capacity. This video also discusses the consequences of towing over the GVWR or GCVWR. This is not intended to scare anyone. Rather, after extensive research, these are the situations RVers have shared.


SOURCE: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEhJLsShZt8McryMf_DHLZQ

Saturday, January 9, 2021

RV Towing at A & T BIG RIG TOWING SERVICES


North Bay Truck Center and A&T Road Service heavy duty towing.We think this is the most flexible and useful rig to tow the biggest trucks on the road, along with big buses, and large RV units.




Our normal service area covers the best part of the bay area and Sacramento region; however, we now have capability to tow across the country if needed. Our A&T Road Service has expanded so much that we had to add towing to make it even more effective and timely.

When you need a tow, Call 1-800-434-1205

Wednesday, January 6, 2021

In NTSB top transport issues, technology's pace quickening, human error in sharp relief

A 2015 crash near Chattanooga, TN where this tractor-trailer plowed into construction zone traffic, striking eight vehicles and killing six occupants.

Technology is the unifying theme running through NTSB's updated Most Wanted List this year as well as the related recommendations the agency has.

All indications in the National Transportation Safety Board's latest "Most Wanted List" of problems to fix in transportation point to one thing: in many ways, technology across that broad industry isn't just advancing, it's accelerating. It is both problem and solution.

Learn more at: https://www.fleetowner.com/safety/article/21703470/in-ntsb-top-transport-issues-technologys-pace-quickening-human-error-in-sharp-relief

Sunday, January 3, 2021

Decoding Dashboard Warning Lights | Consumer Reports


You might have noticed the gallery of icons on your dashboard when you start your car. Consumer Reports’ expert explains what those warning lights mean. Check out https://www.ConsumerReports.org for the latest reviews, tips, and recommendations and subscribe to our YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1Nlb1Ez