2/27/24

Car Theft Prevention Tips


Being alert and taking simple steps can help prevent a vehicle theft from happening to you. Learn more from AAA about what steps you should take so that you don't end up being a victim of car theft.

2/23/24

Tips For Avoiding a Rear-End Crash


You might be able to prevent a rear-end crash if you apply a little technique to how you handle following distance.

2/20/24

Good Headlights Mean Fewer Crashes - IIHS News


                                     Good IIHS headlight ratings linked to lower crash rates

The headlight ratings program developed by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety is reducing dangerous nighttime crashes in the real world, a recent study shows.

Nighttime crash rates per mile are nearly 20 percent lower for vehicles with headlights that earn a good rating in the IIHS evaluation, compared with those with poor-rated headlights, the study found. For vehicles with acceptable or marginal headlights, crash rates are 15 percent and 10 percent lower than for those with poor ratings.

2/17/24

Fleet Drivers: Are You Getting Enough Sleep?


As more businesses resume operations, and more vehicle fleets are getting back on the road, it is important to remember that an alert fleet driver is a safe fleet driver. While no one is immune to drowsy driving, there are steps you can take to help ensure you get enough sleep.

Across North America, this week and next have been designated Drowsy Driving Prevention Week in the US and Canada respectively. A recent study by the National Safety Council revealed that almost 50% of Americans operate their vehicles while too tired to do so. This is a troubling statistic, especially considering the NSC has determined that driving with less than five hours sleep has the same accident risk as driving drunk. In other words, drowsy driving is impaired driving and half of us are driving around without enough sleep!

When you don't get enough sleep, you are more likely to make bad decisions and take more risks. The effects of drowsy driving are staggering, with an estimated 100,000 accidents and 1,500 deaths caused by drowsy driving each year. In addition to the impact on loved ones and family members, driving drowsy results in close to $13 billion in losses per year in the US alone.

The COVID-19 pandemic has added to the problem. Many are struggling with additional stress caused by uncertainty and fear, which is preventing them from getting enough sleep. Neurologists are seeing a spike in patients with sleep disorders caused by COVID-19, and are calling this phenomenon “COVID-somnia.”

What do companies need to remember to prevent drowsy driving?

As more businesses resume operations, and more vehicle fleets are getting back on the road, it is important to remember that an alert fleet driver is a safe fleet driver. Employees may not have driven in a few months, they may be operating a different vehicle, or they may be new hires with little driving experience. Given these additional challenges, it is even more important that drivers are well-rested, alert, and fully aware of their surroundings.

Getting enough sleep is even more important depending on your work environment. Long-haul trucking with heavy loads for example, the sheer size and weight of the truck and cargo combined demands a focused, and alert driver. Similarly, getting enough sleep can be a challenge for others who work long hours, night shifts, or have a very early start time every morning.

The NSC has compiled a list of nine risk factors for driver fatigue, and a staggering 97% of drivers surveyed had at least one of these factors which include: shift work, late working hours, sleep loss, and physically or cognitively demanding work. While no one is immune to drowsy driving, there are steps you can take to help ensure you get enough sleep.

What can fleet drivers do to stay healthy and well-rested during the pandemic and in “normal” times?

The best way to ensure you are well-rested and ready to drive, is to get enough sleep. So how much is enough? The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) recommends that adults get at least between seven and eight hours of sleep every day. Our bodies crave sleep - not getting enough of it can also increase the risk of having high blood pressure, heart disease and lead to other medical problems.

Here are some great tips from NHLBI and UC Davis Health that will help you get a better sleep:

Sleep and wake at consistent times every day, including weekends. Establishing a regular sleep rhythm can make sure your body knows when to stay awake.

Maintain your daily routine when working remotely. Wake up, get dressed and eat breakfast as if you were heading to work. The same goes for after work, try to eat dinner and carry out your evening tasks on a regular schedule.

Establish one hour of quiet time before sleeping. Avoid loud music, strenuous exercise, and bright screens (e.g., smartphone, TV, laptop) and make sure your sleeping area is as dark as possible.

Stay away from heavy meals, alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine right before bed. All of these things will disrupt your sleep.

Use caution with sleep aids. Over-the-counter sleep aids can leave you drowsy the next morning and prescription drugs can lead to dependence.

Stay active - exercising on a daily basis, especially outdoors, can help maintain a more regular sleep rhythm.

Don't take naps - a short nap is ok, but anything over 20 minutes will disrupt your sleep cycle.

Take a hot bath or practice relaxation techniques - such as meditating before going to bed.

If you are already on the road, and feeling a little drowsy, there are a number of things you can do to help stay alert. The National Sleep Foundation recommends the following:

Drive in two-hour shifts with resting stops in between. If you begin to feel drowsy while driving or find yourself dozing, pull over and park as soon as possible to take a short nap.

Drink a caffeinated beverage. While caffeine is not a substitute for sleep, a caffeinated beverage can help you feel more awake after a short nap.

Travel with a passenger who is fully awake. Having someone who can help keep you awake or alert you if you’re drowsy can help prevent an accident. If possible, drive in shifts with your passenger.

Getting enough sleep every day is essential. It's also easier said than done, especially considering the psychological stress that COVID-19 has caused for so many of us. The best thing you can do is try and maintain a regular routine, exercise regularly, and avoid consuming stimulants before bedtime. We hope these tips will help you stay alert and focused on the road. Drive safely!

By Element Fleet Safety - 

By the Element Safety Team

Source: https://www.elementfleet.com/resources/blog/fleet-drivers-are-you-getting-enough-sleep


2/08/24

The Physics of Car Crashes


How is the chemical energy of gasoline transformed into kinetic energy of a moving car? And where does that kinetic energy go when the car crashes into something and stops moving? Thanks to Ford (http://www.takeagoodlook.com) for sponsoring this video. Link to Patreon supporters here: http://www.minutephysics.com/supporte... Music by Nathaniel Schroeder, http://www.soundcloud.com/drschroeder MinutePhysics is on Google+ - http://bit.ly/qzEwc6 And facebook - http://facebook.com/minutephysics And twitter - @minutephysics

2/05/24

AAA Distracted Driving PSA


Whether it’s texting, calling, navigating, or something else, using your cellphone while driving can be dangerous. In fact, texting and driving can have the same consequences as drinking and driving: deaths and injuries. Help reduce the number of these preventable tragedies by putting down your phone—because lives depend on it. You don’t drive intoxicated, so don’t drive intoxicated.


2/02/24

When to Replace Your Tires | Consumer Reports


The lifespan of a tire can range anywhere from 25,000 miles to 100,000 miles. The experts at CR show you how to check your tires so you’ll know exactly when to replace them.

1/30/24

How we Tow HD Trucks, Motor Homes and Buses - NRC Quickswap detachable tow unit



A&T Road Service added Truck 32 in 2014. It was a brand new 2014 Kenworth with a 500 hp Cummins and 18-speed gearbox is outfitted with an NRC Quickswap detachable tow unit with a tag axle for extra capacity. This allows the truck to be a wrecker and also a transfer vehicle, so with the unit disconnected, it will tow mobile home units, trailers of all kinds and with the wrecker unit attached is capable of lifting up to 20,000 lb steer axles for heavy duty truck towing. This unit can easily to HD trucks, buses, mobile homes.

It is outfitted with tools and parts to make minor mechanical repairs, air line repair, fuel line repairs, add fuel, and can take care of any DEF needs. It is also equipped with extra high intensity lights for more effective and efficient night work, since A&T Road Service is available 24 hours a day.

North Bay Truck Center is centrally located in Fairfield CA to service all of Solano County along with much of the San Francisco/Oakland bay area and Sacramento. A&T Road Service is available by calling 800-434-1205, You can also visit our website at http://www.NorthBayTruckCenter.com

1/27/24

Routine Vehicle Safety Recall Check


Maintaining a regular vehicle safety maintenance routine is important to keep your vehicle working as it should. Check for vehicle safety recalls as a part of your vehicle safety maintenance routine. Recall repairs are free. Check for recalls at nhtsa.gov/recalls or by downloading the SaferCar App for iOS or Android.

1/24/24

SAFE STEPS Road Safety: Pedestrians


We all have a role in road safety! So follow these SAFE STEPS to play your part and help save lives. - Stay alert and avoid distractions - - Walk in safe places - - Stop, Look, Listen, Cross - SAFE STEPS Road Safety is a pan-Asian public service initiatives aimed to raise awareness and provide clear and simple life-saving educational messages on road safety. Acclaimed actress and producer, Michelle Yeoh is the SAFE STEPS Road Safety Ambassador. This program is created and developed by Prudence Foundation, in partnership with National Geographic Channel and the Federation Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA). All SAFE STEPS Road Safety tips have been approved by the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC). For more information please visit: www.safesteps.com


1/21/24

Keeping Your Car (and Truck) Sensors Clean | Consumer Reports


Today's cars come with cutting edge technology designed to help keep you safe. Consumer Reports' expert explains how these revolutionary innovations can stop working with one simple thing: dirt.

1/18/24

Opacity Testing At North Bay Truck Center

 


Opacity Testing At North Bay Truck Center

Vehicle owners are required to report vehicles subject to the Clean Truck Check program in the Clean Truck Check - Vehicle Inspection System (CTC-VIS) reporting database . The California Air Resources Board (CARB) is extending the Clean Truck Check reporting deadline to January 31, 2024, to allow vehicle owners additional time to complete their initial fleet reporting and meet the 2023 compliance fee payment requirements.

The Clean Truck Check program applies to nearly all diesel and alternative fuel heavy-duty vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) over 14,000 pounds that operate in California. This includes both in-state and out-of-state vehicles, as well as public vehicles (federal, state, and local government); motorcoaches; transit, shuttle and school buses; hybrid vehicles; commercial vehicles; personal vehicles; California-registered motorhomes; single vehicle fleets; and vehicles registered outside of California (not including motorhomes).

The Clean Truck Check program does not apply to:

  • Zero-emission vehicles,
  • Gasoline vehicles,
  • Military tactical vehicles,
  • Authorized emergency vehicles,
  • Motorhomes registered outside of California,
  • Historical vehicles,
  • Vehicles operating under a CARB-issued experimental permit, and
  • Vehicles operating under an Executive Order or Emergency Declaration.

For more information from the CA ARB, go to https://cleantruckcheck.arb.ca.gov/

Or Call us at 707-427-1386 and we will be happy to help you. 

1/15/24

AAA Pedestrian Safety PSA


Do you know the rules of the road? Drivers and pedestrians need to work together to make roadways safer for pedestrians. Walk safely with tips from AAA.

1/12/24

Cognitive Distraction


Think you know all about distracted driving? Think again! New research reveals that voice-activated in-car technologies dangerously undermine driver attention.

1/09/24

Driving Defensively for CDL Drivers


This training video is for Commercial Drivers License CDL holders and teaches them how to drive defensively while operating big rig, semi trucks and other large delivery vehicles.

1/06/24

Inspecting and Maintaining Tires Will Minimize Roadside Service Calls




It is well documented that the No. 1 cause of roadside service calls is tires. No wonder, there are 18 tires on a typical line-haul service vehicle, more tires than any other vehicle component. You can have the best vehicle maintenance program on the planet, but once that truck leaves the terminal, a number of tire issues can occur that can lead to a roadside service call.

Tread area punctures are the top cause of air loss. A tire failure depends on the size of the puncturing object, in combination with the specific penetration location. If that nail penetrates through one of the tread grooves, chances are higher the nail will break through the tire casing, causing air loss. Tires do not normally have a sudden air loss when a vehicle picks up a puncturing object; they lose air slowly. It may take a few days to lose enough air pressure where the tire sidewalls begin excessive flexing, which generates additional heat build-up.

The tire footprint becomes longer as the tire pressure is reduced, meaning more rubber on the road—which also leads to increased heat. Heat is a tire’s worst nightmare. When a tire continues to generate excessive heat, the rubber actually begins to chemically break down, which will lead to a tire failure. The fact that someone just checked all 18 tires at the morning vehicle walk-around has no bearing on picking a up a nail five minutes down the road.

Sidewall damage/snags are another cause of tire failure. Right side or curb side trailer tires are especially prone to sidewall issues. Vehicles that turn frequently in city driving have the highest incidence of tire sidewall damage. Driver education can play a major role in reducing trailer tire sidewall damage. Drivers who have been on the road for many years will have fewer trailer tire sidewall damage issues than a new driver.

When a vehicle is pulled over for a roadside inspection, tires are high up on the inspector’s checklist. Inspectors are looking for tires with tread depth below the minimum 4/32-in. for steers and 2/32-in. for drives, trailers and dollies. They also are looking for exposed belts and/or fabric along with flat tires. By definition, a tire is flat when the measured air pressure is 50% or less of the maximum tire pressure molded onto the tire sidewall.

If any of these tire conditions are present, the vehicle is flagged as being “out-of-service.” A roadside service call is the only solution for getting the truck up and running again.

There is no excuse for a fleet to have an inspector flag its vehicle as being out-of-service because of a tire-related issue. These types of tire conditions should have been caught during the daily vehicle walk-around. Drivers must be trained to visually inspect tires, take tread depths and even measure tire pressure. It sounds like it is routine, but it’s not. Working with your tire professional on a tires 101 training class will go a long way to reduce roadside service calls.

Visual tire inspections should include running a hand over the tread and sidewall to look for signs of irregular wear and punctures. If a tire is getting close to the legal tread depth, a tread depth gauge measurement is strongly suggested. Make sure to check that the tread depth gauge measures 0 on a flat. Don’t take a measurement at a treadwear indicator location or on top of one of those stone ejectors located at the bottom of many grooves. If you do, you could be off 2/32-in. or 3/32-in.

Measuring tire pressure using a calibrated pressure gauge is very critical. Air carries the load, and tires with low air pressure will lead to excessive heat and premature tire removals. Tire gauges are simple devices, but will quickly lose accuracy. Even a new stick gauge is only accurate to +/-3 PSI brand new, out of the box.

A serious tire program, which includes comprehensive driver training regarding tires, will go a long way in reducing-tire related roadside service calls.

Learn more at: http://www.fleetequipmentmag.com/reducing-tire-related-roadside-service-calls/

Find Truck Tires here.










1/03/24

I’ve Never Seen A Big Rig THIS Stuck (Dangerous And Difficult Recovery)