Wednesday, March 25, 2020

What to Do If There Is an accident?

Q. What should I do at the scene of an accident ?

Ans.
.  STOP Immediately and move only if it is safe to do so.

Call 911 if there are injuries.

Call  the  police.  In  some  areas,  police  authorities  may  respond 
to  every  accident  scene.  They  may  consider  factors  such  as  the 
severity  and  location  of  the  accident  (some  police  authorities 
will not come to the scene if the accident is on private property). 
However,  you  should  attempt  to  notify  the  police.    You  should 
also be aware that most policies require notification to the police
within a specified time period if the accident is a hit and run.

Obtain   names,   addresses,   telephone   numbers,   and   driver’s  
license numbers from all drivers.

Obtain  license  plate(s)  and  vehicle  identification  numbers.    Ask 
to  see  driver’s  license(s)  and  vehicle  registration(s)  to  verify  the 
information is accurate.

Obtain   names,   addresses,   and   telephone   numbers   of   other  
passengers and any witnesses.

If   you   have   a   camera   or   a   cellphone,   take   photographs   of  
the  damage,  and  the  accident  scene  (traffic  controls,  visual 
obstacles).

If  the  owner  of  a  damaged  car  or  damaged  property  cannot  be 
located, leave a note with the names and addresses of the driver
and owners of the involved cars.

Notify your agent and/or your insurance company immediately.

If anyone is injured or the vehicle damage exceeds $750.00, you must  report  the  accident  to  the  Department  of  Motor  Vehicles within  10  days. Failure  to  notify  the  DMW may result in the suspension of your driver’s license.

Learn more at:  http://optimastaging.com/optimatemplate5/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Accident-What-Next-Brochure-10-15-15.pdf

Sunday, March 22, 2020

Safe Fleet’s Predictive Stop Arm™ (PSA) Detects an Average of 4-6 Daily Illegal Passbys Per Bus



Safe Fleet’s Predictive Stop Arm™ (PSA) Detects an Average of 4-6 Daily Illegal Passbys Per Bus
Illegal passbys are a common cause of school bus-related accidents
  • Safe Fleet customers pleased with successful deployment of patents-pending PSA pilot, will continue to deploy on school buses
  • First-to-market Smart Safety Solutions™ aims to proactively keep students out of harm’s way through the use of radar technology and predictive analytics
  • Live demonstration of the Smart Safety Solutions at the Annual National Association for Pupil Transportation Conference and Trade Show (NAPT) in Columbus, Ohio on Nov. 4, 2019
BELTON, Missouri November 4th, 2019 (7:00 AM ET) – Safe Fleet, a leading global provider of safety solutions for fleet vehicles, is pleased to announce the successful completion of the Predictive Stop Arm™ (PSA) pilots deployed in 30 school buses across North America. After this successful pilot phase, Safe Fleet customers have committed to continue to use the school bus safety technology on their school buses.
Safe Fleet has developed Advanced Technology for the Danger Zone to address school bus safety. The Danger Zone is the area extending 15 feet to the front, rear and sides of the bus that poses the highest risk to children of being hit by passing vehicles or their own bus.
The PSA is a first-to-market, patents-pending solution using radar technology and predictive analytics, to monitor oncoming vehicle traffic for probable stop arm violations. The technology helps to further increase safety in the Danger Zone by aiming to notify the bus driver and the students that it may not be safe to cross the street – before an accident occurs.
Safe Fleet’s Right-Hand Danger Zone (RHDZ) technology solution focuses on the right-hand side of the bus, where students are at risk of being caught in the bus doors, wheel wells, or struck by the departing bus. Making use of advanced video analytics, the solution detects students and their movements within a definable right-hand danger zone area and provides notification of potential danger to drivers before a potential accident occurs. One of the solution’s key defining characteristics is that it is not just detecting motion, but rather intelligently identifying objects and the threat they or the bus poses during and shortly after departure.
Safe Fleet will host live demonstrations of the new and innovative Smart Safety Solutions at the Annual National Association for Pupil Transportation Conference and Trade Show (NAPT) in Columbus, Ohio. The demonstrations will be held outside the west side connector of the Greater Columbus Convention Center on November 4, 2019 from 12:00 PM – 4:00 PM  ET.
John Knox, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer at Safe Fleet, states, “The launch of our Smart Safety Solutions marks a significant milestone achievement for us this year. Children are unfortunately still being injured in accidents that could be prevented, and our solutions aims to save lives. Close calls shouldn’t happen and can be avoided with technology like the PSA and the RHDZ. Our goal is to pave the way towards a future where there will be a continuous decline in number of child fatalities in school transportation-related crashes through advancements in technology.”
George Sontag, Transportation Supervisor at Worthington Public Schools, a local school district in Columbus, Ohio, states: “We are proud to partner with Safe Fleet to pilot the PSA solution that takes a proactive approach to increase school bus safety. With the technology they provided, our children are safer and protected against tragic school transportation incidents.”
Safe Fleet expects to launch the PSA across many more districts in the coming year.
About Safe Fleet
Safe Fleet has a vision to reduce preventable deaths and injuries in and around fleet vehicles with a goal of ZERO accidents.  To that end, Safe Fleet’s best-of-breed smart solutions form an integrated safety platform for fleets of every type – School Bus, Transit Bus, Fire, EMS, Law Enforcement, Work Truck, Truck and Trailer, Construction, Agriculture, Waste & Recycling, Industrial and Military.
With our broad portfolio of market-leading safety solutions, 1,600 employees, and 14 manufacturing locations across North America, also serving Europe, Asia and the rest of the globe, Safe Fleet continues to innovate and deliver the smart solutions that fleets will need to survive and thrive in a changing world – and ensure that drivers, passengers, first responders, in-the-field workers, and pedestrians arrive home safely.
At Safe Fleet, we’re Driving Safety Forward.™
For more information about Safe Fleet and its portfolio of brands, please visit www.safefleet.net.
For further information, please contact:
Irene Lo
Magnolia Communications
irene@magnoliamc.com
604.306.1015





Monday, March 16, 2020

U.S. Suspends Truck-Driving Limits to Speed Coronavirus Shipments


U.S. highway-safety regulators are suspending rules that limit daily driving hours for truck drivers moving emergency supplies such as medical equipment, hand sanitizer and food in response to the nationwide coronavirus outbreak, The Wall Street Journal's Jennifer Smith writes. The Transportation Department's Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration announced the nationwide exemption late Friday, following President Trump's declaration of a national emergency over the pandemic. Reference Link SPX SPY Read more at: https://thefly.com/landingPageNews.php?id=3051749

Friday, March 13, 2020

Truck wreck recovery - Chicago Area Fire Dept.


Recovery video of an overturned tractor-trailer and steel coils near Long Grove, IL 3/18/15 with Hillside Towing Co. Photos at shapirophotography.net and the story plus images and video of the rescue of the occupants is at chicagoareafire.com
.

Saturday, March 7, 2020

A &T Road Service NRC Quickswap & Tag Axle - We Can Tow HD Trucks, Motor Homes and Buses



A&T Road Service added Truck 32 in 2014. It was a brand new 2014 Kenworth with a 500 hp Cummins and 18-speed gearbox is outfitted with an NRC Quickswap detachable tow unit with a tag axle for extra capacity. This allows the truck to be a wrecker and also a transfer vehicle, so with the unit disconnected, it will tow mobile home units, trailers of all kinds and with the wrecker unit attached is capable of lifting up to 20,000 lb steer axles for heavy duty truck towing. This unit can easily to HD trucks, buses, mobile homes.

It is outfitted with tools and parts to make minor mechanical repairs, air line repair, fuel line repairs, add fuel, and can take care of any DEF needs. It is also equipped with extra high intensity lights for more effective and efficient night work, since A&T Road Service is available 24 hours a day.

North Bay Truck Center is centrally located in Fairfield CA to service all of Solano County along with much of the San Francisco/Oakland bay area and Sacramento. A&T Road Service is available by calling 800-434-1205, You can also visit our website at http://www.NorthBayTruckCenter.com

Wednesday, March 4, 2020

Ten Keys to Safe City Drivin


Ten Keys to Safe City Driving is brought to you by http://bigcitydriver.com. Written and narrated by Ken Skaggs. 

Sunday, March 1, 2020

A&T Road Service - We'll Get You Back on the Road!



At A&T "Mobile" Truck Road Service we like to think of ourselves as the "Ambulance Service for Trucks." If your truck is broken down, we will come to you and perform the necessary triage to get you back on the road. Now includes towing, load adjustments, and more.

A&T "Mobile" Heavy Duty Truck and Trailer Road Service is a 24-hour, 7-days a week roadside mobile truck repair service for light and medium-duty to heavy duty commercial trucks and trailers. A&T Road Service, a subsidiary of North Bay Truck Center.

Our fleet incudes a 2014 Kenworth (Shown in video) with a 500 hp Cummins and 18-speed gearbox is outfitted with an NRC Quickswap detachable tow unit with a tag axle for extra capacity. This allows the truck to be a wrecker and also a transfer vehicle, so with the unit disconnected, it will tow mobile home units, trailers of all kinds and with the wrecker unit attached is capable of lifting up to 20,000 lb steer axles for heavy duty truck towing. This unit can easily to HD trucks, buses, mobile homes.


Not only do we provide 24 Hour Emergency service, we could come out and do light mechanical work on site to our customer's fleet and avoid the truck having to come in the shop.We will go just about anywhere for anything, at anytime. We have a wide normal service area and have been known to go beyond those boundaries by request. See our Service Area.

Below is a bullet point list of services by A&T Road Service.

 New: In-House TOWING
            Fully Equipped Mobile Repair Units
            Tire Replacement
            Load Adjustments
            Welding
            Fuel Delivery
            Lock-Outs
            Vehicle Storage
            Hydraulics
            DOT & BIT Inspections
            Crane Inspections
            Glass Replacement
            Vehicle Rentals
            Liftgate Repairs and Service
            Tens of Thousands of Parts In Stock


North Bay Truck Center is centrally located in Fairfield CA to service all of Solano County along with much of the San Francisco/Oakland bay area and Sacramento. A&T Road Service is available by calling 800-434-1205,

You can also visit our website at http://www.NorthBayTruckCenter.com

Thursday, February 27, 2020

Safety Tools Truck Drivers Need to Have

Garmin - DriveAssist 51 LMT-S 5" GPS with Built-In Camera and Bluetooth, Lifetime Map and Traffic Updates - Black


Truck drivers perform an important but dangerous work. Safety then should always be a top priority whether on the road or loading and unloading the boxes and crates they're required to deliver. The task proves to be more tiresome particularly if the driver works alone with no companion to help in the loading and unloading aspect.

In the U.S., trucks are among the vehicles that often get involved in road accidents. In 2000 alone, the Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration revealed that more than 450,000 big trucks encountered accidents.

Currently, there are approximately 3.5 million truck drivers in the U.S. handling different types and sizes of trucks. These people should have undergone the necessary CDL or commercial driver's license training that is one of the important qualifications considered by companies when hiring truck drivers.

Trucks need to have the right safety tools that will allow them to fix problems during their travel and navigation devices to guide them when locating their destination. For those who transport huge boxes, they also need to have the proper equipment such as levers for loading and unloading purposes.

GPS navigation device - This is a very important tool that helps drivers locate the place they're going to. With its small monitor, drivers will be able to view a map of their area of destination. There are also units that have voice features and tell drivers the streets they can take.

Vehicle backup camera - As it's hard to monitor a truck's blind spots, having a backup camera is very helpful. This is normally attached on the top part of the license plate and is connected to a monitor positioned on the dashboard or sun visor. With this tool, a driver can easily check what's behind the truck while backing up or moving along the highways before changing lanes or making turns. It's an affordable device that's a must today for all types of vehicles.

Jack and tire iron - You never know when you'll get a flat tire or your tires experience low pressure the reason why having a jack in your truck is very important. The CDL training course will teach you the right way of changing tires so this should not be a problem in case you encounter flat tires during your travel.

Tire chains - Also known as snow chains, these devices are meant to provide traction when you're driving through snow and ice. These are fitted in the drive wheels of the vehicle and are required by transportation authorities during snowy conditions. Usually, they are sold in pairs. When these are in place, you have also to reduce your speed to ensure the safety of your vehicle.

Other than these devices, a truck driver traveling on long hauls should also bring along water, food and extra clothing. There are times when you need to travel through desert areas or places wherein there are no restaurants along the highways so it's always best to be ready.

Getting your CDL training should provide you with the appropriate knowledge on truck driving safety and the tools you need to have while traveling. So never ignore its value for it will benefit you for the long term.

By

For great information on CDL training, visit Truck-School.com
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kalyan_Kumar

Monday, February 24, 2020

Friday, February 21, 2020

Ford Service Advice: Do I Need New Tires? | Service Advice | Ford



This video will explain the importance of having proper tread on your tires to ensure safety, performance, and handling, how to check tread depth, as well as key signs that you may need to replace your tires. Learn more about Ford Service Advice here: http://ford.to/FordOwner

Saturday, February 15, 2020

Every fleet has a common goal to significantly minimize roadside service call.


It is well documented that the No. 1 cause of roadside service calls are tires. No wonder, there are 18 tires on a typical line-haul service vehicle, more tires than any other vehicle component. You can have the best vehicle maintenance program on the planet, but once that truck leaves the terminal, a number of tire issues can occur that can lead to a roadside service call.

Tread area punctures are the top cause of air loss. A tire failure depends on the size of the puncturing object, in combination with the specific penetration location. If that nail penetrates through one of the tread grooves, chances are higher the nail will break through the tire casing, causing air loss. Tires do not normally have a sudden air loss when a vehicle picks up a puncturing object; they lose air slowly. It may take a few days to lose enough air pressure where the tire sidewalls begin excessive flexing, which generates additional heat build-up.

The tire footprint becomes longer as the tire pressure is reduced, meaning more rubber on the road—which also leads to increased heat. Heat is a tire’s worst nightmare. When a tire continues to generate excessive heat, the rubber actually begins to chemically break down, which will lead to a tire failure. The fact that someone just checked all 18 tires at the morning vehicle walk-around has no bearing on picking a up a nail five minutes down the road.

Sidewall damage/snags are another cause of tire failure. Right side or curb side trailer tires are especially prone to sidewall issues. Vehicles that turn frequently in city driving have the highest incidence of tire sidewall damage. Driver education can play a major role in reducing trailer tire sidewall damage. Drivers who have been on the road for many years will have fewer trailer tire sidewall damage issues than a new driver.

When a vehicle is pulled over for a roadside inspection, tires are high up on the inspector’s checklist. Inspectors are looking for tires with tread depth below the minimum 4/32-in. for steers and 2/32-in. for drives, trailers and dollies. They also are looking for exposed belts and/or fabric along with flat tires. By definition, a tire is flat when the measured air pressure is 50% or less of the maximum tire pressure molded onto the tire sidewall.

If any of these tire conditions are present, the vehicle is flagged as being “out-of-service.” A roadside service call is the only solution for getting the truck up and running again.

There is no excuse for a fleet to have an inspector flag its vehicle as being out-of-service because of a tire-related issue. These types of tire conditions should have been caught during the daily vehicle walk-around. Drivers must be trained to visually inspect tires, take tread depths and even measure tire pressure. It sounds like it is routine, but it’s not. Working with your tire professional on a tires 101 training class will go a long way to reduce roadside service calls.

Visual tire inspections should include running a hand over the tread and sidewall to look for signs of irregular wear and punctures. If a tire is getting close to the legal tread depth, a tread depth gauge measurement is strongly suggested. Make sure to check that the tread depth gauge measures 0 on a flat. Don’t take a measurement at a treadwear indicator location or on top of one of those stone ejectors located at the bottom of many grooves. If you do, you could be off 2/32-in. or 3/32-in.

Measuring tire pressure using a calibrated pressure gauge is very critical. Air carries the load, and tires with low air pressure will lead to excessive heat and premature tire removals. Tire gauges are simple devices, but will quickly lose accuracy. Even a new stick gauge is only accurate to +/-3 PSI brand new, out of the box.

A serious tire program, which includes comprehensive driver training regarding tires, will go a long way in reducing-tire related roadside service calls.

Learn more at: http://www.fleetequipmentmag.com/reducing-tire-related-roadside-service-calls/










Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Winter Treads



When much of the country is getting pounded by winter storms and deep snow, our thoughts turn to tires. Some pickup truck owners have separate wardrobes for summer and winter. Nome, Alaska, and Miami residents maybe not so much.

Pickup winter wear can include anything from a fresh wax to do-it-yourself undercoating to lighter lubricating fluids to a block heater to winter diesel fuel. But does your truck's cold-weather wardrobe include winter tires?

Winter tires are designed for cold weather and associated precipitation. Tires rated for mud and snow (M+S) may not qualify as winter tires and often don't excel in either mud or snow. A winter tire's specific compound, tread design — and studs if you want them — is far more suitable and safer on cold roads and the various forms of water you might find on them.

In every road-based comparison in which I've participated, dedicated winter tires were more valuable than the number of driven wheels. However, while winter tires can improve performance, they are no substitute for common sense and can be pushed beyond their limits. They also add expense and create the issue of storage logistics.

The U.S., unlike some countries, does not mandate winter tire use, although some states and cities have laws about the use of studded tires or chains. It's worth noting that some insurance companies offer discounts for using winter tires.

Do you think winter tires should be required for new drivers or general safety, and if so, under what parameters? And if you don't believe in running dedicated winter tires, studs or chains, how do you deal with marginal winter traction? Let us know in the comments section below.

Source: http://news.pickuptrucks.com/2017/01/talking-trucks-tuesday-winter-treads.html#more

By G.R. Whale

Cars.com graphic by Paul Dolan; cars.com image by Bruce Smith

Sunday, February 9, 2020

Truck Broken Down? Call A&T Road Service - Our NRC Quickswap & Tag Axle Can Tow HD trucks, buses and mobile homes



Call 800-434-1205

A&T Road Service added Truck 32 in 2014. It was a brand new 2014 Kenworth with a 500 hp Cummins and an 18-speed gearbox is outfitted with an NRC Quickswap detachable tow unit with a tag axle for extra capacity. This allows the truck to be a wrecker and also a transfer vehicle, so with the unit disconnected, it will tow mobile home units, trailers of all kinds and with the wrecker unit attached is capable of lifting up to 20,000 lb steer axles for heavy-duty truck towing. This unit can easily to HD trucks, buses, mobile homes.

It is outfitted with tools and parts to make minor mechanical repairs, air-line repair, fuel line repairs, add fuel, and can take care of any DEF needs. It is also equipped with extra high-intensity lights for more effective and efficient night work since A&T Road Service is available 24 hours a day.

Visit A&T Road Service at https://www.truckmobilerepair.com/

And North Bay Truck Center is centrally located in Fairfield CA to service all of Solano County along with much of the San Francisco/Oakland bay area and Sacramento. A&T Road Service is available by calling 800-434-1205, You can also visit the NBTC website at http://www.NorthBayTruckCenter.com

Thursday, February 6, 2020

Every fleet has a common goal to significantly minimize roadside service call.





It is well documented that the No. 1 cause of roadside service calls is tires. No wonder, there are 18 tires on a typical line-haul service vehicle, more tires than any other vehicle component. You can have the best vehicle maintenance program on the planet, but once that truck leaves the terminal, a number of tire issues can occur that can lead to a roadside service call.

Tread area punctures are the top cause of air loss. A tire failure depends on the size of the puncturing object, in combination with the specific penetration location. If that nail penetrates through one of the tread grooves, chances are higher the nail will break through the tire casing, causing air loss. Tires do not normally have a sudden air loss when a vehicle picks up a puncturing object; they lose air slowly. It may take a few days to lose enough air pressure where the tire sidewalls begin excessive flexing, which generates additional heat build-up.

The tire footprint becomes longer as the tire pressure is reduced, meaning more rubber on the road—which also leads to increased heat. Heat is a tire’s worst nightmare. When a tire continues to generate excessive heat, the rubber actually begins to chemically break down, which will lead to a tire failure. The fact that someone just checked all 18 tires at the morning vehicle walk-around has no bearing on picking a up a nail five minutes down the road.

Sidewall damage/snags are another cause of tire failure. Right side or curb side trailer tires are especially prone to sidewall issues. Vehicles that turn frequently in city driving have the highest incidence of tire sidewall damage. Driver education can play a major role in reducing trailer tire sidewall damage. Drivers who have been on the road for many years will have fewer trailer tire sidewall damage issues than a new driver.

When a vehicle is pulled over for a roadside inspection, tires are high up on the inspector’s checklist. Inspectors are looking for tires with tread depth below the minimum 4/32-in. for steers and 2/32-in. for drives, trailers and dollies. They also are looking for exposed belts and/or fabric along with flat tires. By definition, a tire is flat when the measured air pressure is 50% or less of the maximum tire pressure molded onto the tire sidewall.

If any of these tire conditions are present, the vehicle is flagged as being “out-of-service.” A roadside service call is the only solution for getting the truck up and running again.

There is no excuse for a fleet to have an inspector flag its vehicle as being out-of-service because of a tire-related issue. These types of tire conditions should have been caught during the daily vehicle walk-around. Drivers must be trained to visually inspect tires, take tread depths and even measure tire pressure. It sounds like it is routine, but it’s not. Working with your tire professional on a tires 101 training class will go a long way to reduce roadside service calls.

Visual tire inspections should include running a hand over the tread and sidewall to look for signs of irregular wear and punctures. If a tire is getting close to the legal tread depth, a tread depth gauge measurement is strongly suggested. Make sure to check that the tread depth gauge measures 0 on a flat. Don’t take a measurement at a treadwear indicator location or on top of one of those stone ejectors located at the bottom of many grooves. If you do, you could be off 2/32-in. or 3/32-in.

Measuring tire pressure using a calibrated pressure gauge is very critical. Air carries the load, and tires with low air pressure will lead to excessive heat and premature tire removals. Tire gauges are simple devices, but will quickly lose accuracy. Even a new stick gauge is only accurate to +/-3 PSI brand new, out of the box.

A serious tire program, which includes comprehensive driver training regarding tires, will go a long way in reducing-tire related roadside service calls.

Learn more at: http://www.fleetequipmentmag.com/reducing-tire-related-roadside-service-calls/










Monday, February 3, 2020

As trucks get more complex, so does fleet maintenance

Technicians are turning to new tools and technologies to overcome these challenges and reaping dividends through predictive maintenance and less vehicle downtime. 


The growing complexity of modern trucks is driving changes at maintenance shops and for the workers who have to navigate this increasingly digital world.

“Electronics allow vehicles to have a better conversation with technicians than ever before,” said Kristy LaPage, business manager of the commercial vehicle group at Mitchell 1. “In the transition from mechanical to electronic control systems, there has also been a shift from technicians to diagnosticians. Vehicle electronics are the source of information that can become actionable, so shop solutions are evolving with this change.”

“The digital shop is not only changing inspection and maintenance practices,” said Jeff Sweet, solutions engineer at Decisiv, a provider of a service relationship management (SRM) platform. “Advancements in sensors and monitoring continue to improve fault condition filtering and help prioritize work based on fault severity.”

Photo: Noregon

A solution that simultaneously diagnoses all components is now essential as an intake tool for technicians.

Also constantly under development are the tools technicians need to service advanced electronic systems.

“A solution that simultaneously diagnoses all components is now essential as an intake tool,” stated Tim Bigwood, CEO at Noregon Systems, a provider of JPRO commercial vehicle diagnostic and monitoring solutions. “And those tools have evolved because while previously there were limited fault trees to consider based on symptoms, today’s vehicles are more complex, so the aid of a diagnostic and repair solution is a necessity.”

The increase in electronics on vehicles is allowing for real-time access to the equipment’s operating conditions and fault data, noted Renaldo Adler, industrial principal, asset maintenance, at Trimble Transportation Enterprise.

“Fleets now have access to a vast amount of diagnostic data needed to repair assets faster,” he said. “Inspections can also be improved with the use of electronic diagnostic tools, which analyze the equipment’s condition and any active faults, so maintenance departments are able to be proactive.”
Remote diagnostics

All of the original equipment manufacturers offer systems on their new trucks that provide diagnostic data. These sensor-based and telematics-driven solutions can improve maintenance efficiency and vehicle uptime.

Kenworth dealers, for example, use diagnostic data from TruckTech+ Remote Diagnostics.

“We have found it can cut the time a unit is in our shop by 30%,” said Josh Hayes, branch manager at NorCal Kenworth – San Leandro. “We’ve also found that among trucks with TruckTech+ Remote Diagnostics, we’re seeing about a 15% reduction in the number of trucks that must be towed because remote diagnostics allow us to monitor fault codes and diagnose issues to determine if a truck can be driven into the shop.”

Photo: Mack Trucks

For OEMs, part of the value of remote diagnostics systems is that the vehicle is effectively reporting its own status.

Sanjiv Khurana, general manager of digital vehicle solutions at Daimler Trucks North America, said with the Detroit “virtual technician” system, maintenance managers get real-time alerts and a plan for critical faults. When the truck arrives at the service location, the diagnostic information and fault history allow the technician to get a jump-start on the repair process.

At Peterbilt, SmartLinq remote diagnostics have been integrated with reasoning engine technology to enable more precise diagnostic information, fault code collection, and enhanced analysis by linking cascading faults.

Volvo, Mack, and Navistar also offer their own systems, aimed at reducing downtime and allowing for over-the-air software updates.

“With the increase in electronics on commercial vehicles, fleets have a better understanding of vehicle health,” said Brian Mulshine, director of customer experience for Navistar’s OnCommand Connection.

In short, the value in all of these remote diagnostics systems is that the vehicle is effectively reporting its own status to a maintenance operation.

“The key for truck fleets is to apply electronics to enable a proactive system that adds value and not cost,” said Wally Stegall, technical fellow, director at Morey Corp.

Robert Braswell, executive director of the Technology & Maintenance Council (TMC), noted that greater vehicle complexity makes preventive maintenance more of a challenge. “Until enough fleet data in the field is gathered, it makes it more difficult to optimize service and inspection schedules for new electronic systems,” he explained. “But increasing complexity can bring with it sensor-based maintenance strategies that can help with self-diagnostics.”

Source: https://www.fleetowner.com/maintenance/trucks-get-more-complex-so-does-fleet-maintenance?NL=FO-02&Issue=FO-02_20190321_FO-02_446&sfvc4enews=42&cl=article_1_b&utm_rid=CPENT000004488230&utm_campaign=23847&utm_medium=email&elq2=5bd8750c9eba4791abe0019c109758f6

Tuesday, January 28, 2020

Unlocking an Abandoned Semi & Towing It Away For CHP


In today's video Trent jr is called out by CHP to tow away a truck that has been abandoned. The owner of the truck was contacted and e said he doesn't want it anymore. Trent Jr has to unlock the vehicle using lockout tools to allow the CHP officer to get information off of the truck such as VIN. Enjoy!
Thanks for watching as always LIKE, COMMENT, SUBSCRIBE, and SHARE the HECK out of this video!

Saturday, January 25, 2020

5 Steps To Buying A Big Rig


When you decide to buy a truck there are some simple steps you can take to be sure you get the best bang for your buck. If you go into a truck purchase blindly, you are likely to pay too much and get much less than you hoped for.

1. Shop Around.

Truck dealers can only advertise in their own region. A truck dealership in Ohio is not allowed to advertise in California. But dealerships are allowed to sell trucks to customers in other regions if the customer contacts them. As you travel, grab some truck papers from different regions of the country and consider contacting dealers that are far from you. If you already know what make of truck you want, call around to dealers around the country.

2. Compare Apples to Apples.

If you are going to be ordering a new truck, ask for a price quote along with the specifications- this will be about 10 pages long. Compare the spec sheets from different dealers line for line. You may find that a salesman who gives you a lower price quote also skimped out on some of the options without mentioning that to you. If you find that a salesman's quote has inferior specs, tell them which ones you want changed and have them resend the specs and quote. ALWAYS read through the specs line by line- don't trust anything verbal. You may have to pay a chunk of change to receive the faxes from all these dealers, but at least you'll know you're comparing prices, not options.

3. Prioritize

If you are shopping for a used truck, it's unlikely that you will be able to find two trucks that are exactly alike. You won't be able to compare apples to apples like you would if you were buying a new truck. Make a list of the specifications that are most important to you. What make and model are you looking for? How old and roughly how many miles? What engine do you want? What transmission? What rears? Once you nail down those requirements, you may have to compromise on some of the options. Power windows, gauge packages, color. Most options can be changed if they are not to your liking. The things that matter most are the things that are permanent, but you will want to consider the less important options once you have narrowed it down to a few trucks.

4. Get a loan from your own bank.

If you have the dealership set up financing, they are likely to add "points" to your interest rate. There is nothing unethical about this- you are, after all, using their resources to secure financing and they should be compensated for the work their employees do. But you need to decide if you are willing to pay the difference over the life of the loan. The bank may give you a 10% interest rate, but the dealer sets it up for 12% and will pocket the difference with each payment you make. Generally, the dealer will not disclose this information. However, you need to be aware that you may be able to secure a lower interest rate on your own. Consider- a difference of 3% will save you hundreds of dollars each month. It's worth it to do the extra legwork on your own.

5. Make sure you can afford the truck.

There are a lot of owner-operator contracts out there. There are many more mediocre owner-operator contracts than there are lucrative ones. Before you take on the risks involved with owning a truck, make sure you have a contract that can pay for it. Will you be pouring every dime you make back into the truck? Calculate the costs of fuel and maintenance and taxes. If you are a company driver, spend a few months putting your records on paper. Look at the bottom line- what will you have left after all your expenses? If you are not yet a driver, you will want to spend a couple of years driving a truck as a company driver before you decide to buy a truck on your own. Don't buy the lie that owner-operators with rates twice as high as company drivers are making twice as much. They may not even be making the same amount once you figure in all the expenses.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Suzanne_Roquemore

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

What You Need to Know If Your Car Is Towed After an Accident

A car crash can mean a lot of work for you. As you navigate your medical needs, report the crash to your insurance company, and work to protect your legal rights, you also have to deal with the headache of getting your car back if it’s been towed and paying the towing fees. When your car is towed after an accident

The police will likely order that your car be towed if it cannot be driven from the accident scene. You may have no choice as to where it is towed and may later need to have it towed again from a storage lot to a mechanic. Often, a storage fee is assessed for every day that your car remains in the storage lot. For these reasons, the cost of towing your vehicle can quickly add up to hundreds of dollars or more.

Who Pays for Towing Costs After a Crash?

The answer depends on the actions you take and the terms of the insurance policies that are applicable after your crash. Many insurance policies that include collision coverage will cover reasonable towing and storage fees. The term “reasonable” may be defined in the insurance policy as a number of days. It is important to comply with the terms of the policy, so you don’t end up paying the costs out of your own pocket. If you are physically unable to take action, it is important to have someone do it on your behalf.

Additionally, it is important to have the necessary insurance adjusters come look at your car before it is moved from the storage lot. They will want to assess the damage before the car is moved. You should document every attempt to contact the insurance company, so you have proof of any insurance company delay that costs you money. You may also consult with your lawyer about what actions you can take to protect your rights if this type of delay occurs.
Getting Your Car Back After It’s Towed

The first thing you need to do is determine the towing location. You can ask for this information from the police and the towing company at the scene of the crash. If you are unable to do so, someone acting on your behalf should find out as soon as possible after the accident. You can then contact the storage facility about getting your car yourself or getting it towed to a mechanic of your choosing.

Learn more at: https://www.kffjlaw.com/blog/what-to-do-if-your-car-is-towed-after-a-car-crash.cfm

Saturday, January 18, 2020

How to Properly Load a Trailer - CURT


This short video will teach you how to properly load a trailer. The most important thing to consider is how the weight of your cargo is distributed onto your trailer. The ideal distribution is to have 60% of the weight in front of the trailer axle, and 40% behind. Its also very important to make sure your cargo is secured properly. Always practice safe towing.

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

A&T Road Service - #1 Source for Heavy Duty and RV Towing


We are your number one source for heavy duty towing in the Bay and Sacramento Areas. Our normal service area covers the best part of the bay area and Sacramento region; however, we now have capability to tow across the country if needed. Our A&T Road Service has expanded so much that we had to add towing to make it even more effective and timely.

North Bay Truck Center and A&T Road Service have added heavy duty towing to our overall list of services. We searched for the most flexible and useful rigs to tow the biggest trucks on the road, along with big buses, and large RV units.

Holmes D.T.U. (Detachable Towing Unit). This proven design and technology comes from the most trusted name in the towing industry. The front legs allow the unit to be easily removed in a matter of minutes so the truck can be multi-functional for both towing or pulling trailers. It has a lifting capacity of 16,000 lbs when extended and will extend up to 113 inches past the tailboard.
Need a tow? Call 1-800-434-1205

Sunday, January 12, 2020

New CDL Truck Driver Tips Using Gross Weight Scales To Scale Your Trailer Load



This new commercial truck or potential CDL truck driver tips video discusses how to scale your load if you are on a gross weight scale where each axle is not broken out for you. Most truck driver shippers or distribution centers who are larger will have scales, but most only will have a gross weight scale, not an individual axle scale. I show you how to figure your scale load out per axle when you only have a gross weight scale for your 18 wheeler big rig.

Thursday, January 9, 2020

EVIR® Electronic Verified Inspection Reporting

Tag, inspect and transmit - it’s that simple

Tractor / Trailer Inspection configuation

TAG – Data-encoded RFID tags are placed in each inspection zone of a vehicle or asset. In a commercial trucking environment, for example, tags are placed in inspection zones that adhere to DOT compliance requirements for pre- and post-trip inspections. Many school districts place tags at the back of a bus to ensure that drivers perform their end-of-shift check for students.

INSPECT – The individual performing the inspection must physically scan each tag on the vehicle. The tablet device must be within two inches of the point of inspection, which helps to verify that a check was performed and the vehicle is up to operating standards. EVIR acts as an electronic, verifiable log to prove that inspections are being performed accurately and consistently.




TRANSMIT – Defects or vehicle damage can be captured with Zonar's tablet device. Equipped with a 5 mega-pixel camera, drivers can easily transmit photos to give maintenance a heads-up as to what they are seeing. After the tablet is docked inside the vehicle, the inspection data is seamlessly transferred back to Zonar's web-based application, Ground Traffic Control®. Fleet managers and maintenance personnel have immediate access to the inspection data from the field, helping them to prioritize and schedule repairs.

Not just for vehicles

The EVIR system is as flexible as our customers' unique needs. While most commonly used to verify the pre- and post-trip inspection process for fleets across all industries, EVIR use spans to wherever there's a need to verify a process is being followed.

A complete solution provider

Zonar offers a full suite of smart fleet technology solutions that improve safety, decrease downtime of vehicles, reduce fuel costs, coach driver performance, and streamline back-office reporting.

Unparalleled customer service

From onboarding to installation, our U.S.-based Customer Care team makes sure that you’re set up for success. There’s a reason more than 99 percent of our customers that choose to do business with us, stay with us. More than 30 percent of our company is devoted to after-sale support, which means you can always reach a live Zonar employee—24/7/365.

Learn more at: http://zonarsystems.com/solutions/evir-electronic-verified-inspection-reporting/


Saturday, January 4, 2020

In NTSB top transport issues, technology's pace quickening, human error in sharp relief

Technology is the unifying theme running through NTSB's updated Most Wanted List this year as well as the related recommendations the agency has.


A 2015 crash near Chattanooga, TN where this tractor-trailer plowed into construction zone traffic, striking eight vehicles and killing six occupants.

All indications in the National Transportation Safety Board's latest "Most Wanted List" of problems to fix in transportation point to one thing: in many ways, technology across that broad industry isn't just advancing, it's accelerating. It is both problem and solution.
Technology is the unifying and strongest theme running through NTSB's updated list this year as well as the related recommendations the agency has for state governments and others to solve these "most critical" woes in transportation. NTSB investigates transportation accidents and deaths throughout the year, and the Most Wanted List shows how the focus for those efforts is changing, as these problems themselves are.
Source: Fleet Owner

Wednesday, January 1, 2020