Saturday, December 7, 2019

A&T Road (and Shop) Service

If we need to take it to our shop, we have a full service truck repair facility with the capability to service and repair virtually any truck or trailer.


We repair engines, axles, brakes, electrical, hydraulic, tires and wheels, trailers, air brakes and hoses, transmissions and we even do a little body repair when needed. We carry replacement parts and all the tools we need to get what ever needs fixing done as quickly and efficiently as possible. Most of the time, we can do the repairs at the site of the truck breakdown. 

But if we have to tow, at our facility, we have tens of thousands of parts, fittings, filters (we have one of the largest selections of Baldwin filters in the U.S.), brake linings, belts, hoses, brake drums, electrical parts--you name it and we probably have it and if not, we can get it very, very quickly. We have a large selection of Grote lighting products including LED. We stock a huge selection of Goodyear belts and hoses for all truck uses. Our entire business at North Bay Truck Center and A&T Road Service is fixing your truck right the first time in the minimum amount of time.

Wednesday, December 4, 2019

What's Roadcheck got to do with HOS?


It  should come as no surprise that the focus of this year’s Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance Roadcheck will be hours of service (HOS) compliance.


CVSA roadchecks


On June 5-7, the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s (CVSA) International Roadcheck will take place. This is the annual 72-hour period when commercial motor vehicle inspectors conduct inspections on motor vehicles and drivers.

It should come as no surprise that the focus of this year’s Roadcheck will be hours of service (HOS) compliance. With the recent full enforcement of the electronic logging device mandate, it makes sense that this is what CVSA chose as its focus. And while the ELD mandate did not change the hours of service rules, it did help shed light on compliance with the HOS regulations.

It’s also probably a result of what happened during last year’s safety blitz when violations for hours of service was the number one reason drivers were placed out of service. CVSA reported a whopping 32% of drivers placed out of service for violations related to hours of service.

Ensuring hours of service compliance is a fleet-wide responsibility. It goes without saying that fleets should already have ELDs installed on all their trucks and if they don't, they better get on that today.

Fleet management also needs to take time to reinforce to drivers and dispatchers that it expects adherence to hours of service rules and will not tolerate dispatchers pressuring drivers to drive past their legal hours nor drivers who violate the rules. Drivers’ hours should be meticulously tracked, making it easier for dispatchers to see which drivers have legal hours left to ensure they meet their customers’ need while staying in compliance.


Dispatchers need to make sure they review driver hours and only assign drivers to loads when those drivers can make those deliveries observing the rules of the road including speed limits, and drivers who had been gaming the system by fudging on paper logs need to review hours of service so they can stay in compliance.

The CVSA website reminds us that while hours of service are the focus of Roadcheck, inspectors will be conducting Standard Level 1 Inspections, the 37-step procedures that include an examination of the driver as well as the vehicle’s mechanical fitness. Now is also the time to insist drivers do their DVIRs and that your maintenance personnel pay attention to the issues drivers are bringing to their attention.

You still have time to prepare your drivers and vehicles for Roadcheck and ensure your trucks aren't the ones taken out of service June 5 through 7.

Sunday, December 1, 2019

A & T Road Service - NRC Quickswap with TAG AXLE


This is a 2014 Kenworth with a Cummins 500 hp engine and 18-speed transmission. The working end of this mighty tow vehicle is the NRC Quickswap unit with tag axle.

QUICK SWAP & TAG The Quickswap with Tag Axle is a class of its own. It features a unique lightweight yet powerful detachable design to let you do things differently and be successful where others fail.

Unique to NRC, the Tag Axle is the perfect addition to get the best out of any NRC heavy tow truck. The NRC underlift system to instantly increase its payload and enhances the truck’s braking power.

Thursday, November 28, 2019

Tongue Weight Safety Demonstration


Proper trailer tongue weight improves the vehicle and trailer towing experience by improving performance. Not enough tongue weight or force on the hitch/tow ball causes an increase in trailer sway from side to side, making it difficult to control. Conversely, too much tongue weight or force on the hitch/tow ball could overload the rear tires of the towing vehicle, pushing the rear end of the vehicle around. This could also negatively affect the vehicle handling. Performance is impaired as you might not be able to go around corners and curves properly, and your vehicle may not stop quickly enough when you press the brake pedal. The Weigh Safe Drop Hitch effectively measures the tongue weight of your towing load, improving the vehicle tow load balance and performance.

Learn more at: https://www.weigh-safe.com/

Monday, November 25, 2019

Winter Tire Test: Some Treads Are Better Than Others



By Bruce W. Smith

Every so often I find myself checking out the tires of the vehicles around me when stopped in traffic, wondering how this or that one performs compared to the factory tires on my pickup truck. My questions become even more pointed in winter: Should I invest in a set of winter tires? Would mud tires be a good choice or all-terrain? Would it be worth the investment to buy a dedicated snow tire and run them half the year?

To find out, we went to the snow-covered hills just a few miles outside Steamboat Springs, Colo. Carved into the deep snow were three perfectly groomed snow courses with big berms and a variety of twists, turns and elevation changes. These tracks are the training grounds for the Bridgestone Winter Driving School. They also serve as the perfect location to test tires — and for us to see how popular pickup tire tread patterns compare when pitted against each other under controlled winter driving conditions.

And even though it's spring, the information we're offering here should help you decide what kind of tires you want next winter.

The Contenders
We spent two days this past winter with Woody Rogers and T.J. Campbell, product information specialists for Tire Rack, comparing popular 275/65R18 tires on a twisting, curving half-mile section of track three behind the wheel of two identical 2016 Ford F-150 4x4s. The tire comparison contenders were:

  • Goodyear Wrangler Fortitude HT OWL SL (P-metric)
  • Bridgestone Blizzak DM-V2 SL (P-metric)
  • Goodyear Ultra Grip Ice WRT LT (E load range)
  • BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A KO2 RWL LT (C load range)
  • Firestone Destination MT LT (E load range)

Source: www.pickuptrucks.com

Read more at: http://news.pickuptrucks.com/2016/03/winter-tire-test-some-treads-are-better-than-others.html

Friday, November 22, 2019

The World’s Biggest Towing Convention Moves to Atlantic City - Dec 4-8th 2019!


The American Towman Exposition is Making a move to America’s Playground! Atlantic City will host the 2019 convention. Hear from AT-TV Reporter Emily Oz as she visits Atlantic City to showcase what you can expect to see. This video is sponsored by American Towman Magazine featured on www.itowman.com and www.towindustryweek.com.

Tuesday, November 19, 2019

Learn from the Pros at Miller Industries Demo @ Tow Expo Dallas


The Team at Miller Industries takes us through a few scenarios at their Live Recovery Demo at Tow Expo Dallas 2017. Hear from Billy Drane of Miller who was leading the show. This video is brought to you by the American Towman Exposition in Baltimore November 17-19. It's one for the Ages, you don't want to miss it! www.ATExposition.com

Saturday, November 16, 2019

Every fleet has a common goal to significantly minimize roadside service call.


It is well documented that the No. 1 cause of roadside service calls is tires. No wonder, there are 18 tires on a typical line-haul service vehicle, more tires than any other vehicle component. You can have the best vehicle maintenance program on the planet, but once that truck leaves the terminal, a number of tire issues can occur that can lead to a roadside service call.

Tread area punctures are the top cause of air loss. A tire failure depends on the size of the puncturing object, in combination with the specific penetration location. If that nail penetrates through one of the tread grooves, chances are higher the nail will break through the tire casing, causing air loss. Tires do not normally have a sudden air loss when a vehicle picks up a puncturing object; they lose air slowly. It may take a few days to lose enough air pressure where the tire sidewalls begin excessive flexing, which generates additional heat build-up.

The tire footprint becomes longer as the tire pressure is reduced, meaning more rubber on the road—which also leads to increased heat. Heat is a tire’s worst nightmare. When a tire continues to generate excessive heat, the rubber actually begins to chemically break down, which will lead to a tire failure. The fact that someone just checked all 18 tires at the morning vehicle walk-around has no bearing on picking a up a nail five minutes down the road.

Sidewall damage/snags are another cause of tire failure. Right side or curb side trailer tires are especially prone to sidewall issues. Vehicles that turn frequently in city driving have the highest incidence of tire sidewall damage. Driver education can play a major role in reducing trailer tire sidewall damage. Drivers who have been on the road for many years will have fewer trailer tire sidewall damage issues than a new driver.

When a vehicle is pulled over for a roadside inspection, tires are high up on the inspector’s checklist. Inspectors are looking for tires with tread depth below the minimum 4/32-in. for steers and 2/32-in. for drives, trailers and dollies. They also are looking for exposed belts and/or fabric along with flat tires. By definition, a tire is flat when the measured air pressure is 50% or less of the maximum tire pressure molded onto the tire sidewall.

If any of these tire conditions are present, the vehicle is flagged as being “out-of-service.” A roadside service call is the only solution for getting the truck up and running again.

There is no excuse for a fleet to have an inspector flag its vehicle as being out-of-service because of a tire-related issue. These types of tire conditions should have been caught during the daily vehicle walk-around. Drivers must be trained to visually inspect tires, take tread depths and even measure tire pressure. It sounds like it is routine, but it’s not. Working with your tire professional on a tires 101 training class will go a long way to reduce roadside service calls.

Visual tire inspections should include running a hand over the tread and sidewall to look for signs of irregular wear and punctures. If a tire is getting close to the legal tread depth, a tread depth gauge measurement is strongly suggested. Make sure to check that the tread depth gauge measures 0 on a flat. Don’t take a measurement at a treadwear indicator location or on top of one of those stone ejectors located at the bottom of many grooves. If you do, you could be off 2/32-in. or 3/32-in.

Measuring tire pressure using a calibrated pressure gauge is very critical. Air carries the load, and tires with low air pressure will lead to excessive heat and premature tire removals. Tire gauges are simple devices, but will quickly lose accuracy. Even a new stick gauge is only accurate to +/-3 PSI brand new, out of the box.

A serious tire program, which includes comprehensive driver training regarding tires, will go a long way in reducing-tire related roadside service calls.

Learn more at: http://www.fleetequipmentmag.com/reducing-tire-related-roadside-service-calls/










Wednesday, November 13, 2019

Tips for Winter Truck Driving

person holding steering wheel


Driving a truck in the winter can be a challenge even for the most experienced drivers. There are many precautions that drivers should take while driving in winter weather conditions.

Truck drivers should always listen to their CB while driving in winter conditions. Many other drivers will be able to tip off other drivers when the weather conditions worsen ahead. Also many companies offer weather updates at least once per day. It is very important to pay attention to the weather advisory while driving in winter conditions.

Another useful tip that experienced drivers offer is to take all ramps at least 5 miles per hour less than the posted signs. The posted limits on ramps are designed for standard conditions in automobiles. Anytime trucks are traveling in bad weather it is better be safe than sorry.

A good indicator of icy roads it to keep an eye on the back of the side view mirrors. When ice starts to build up on the back of the side view mirror it will most likely also be on the road ahead.
Always pay attention to oncoming traffic. If traffic heading in the direction that the driver is going has slowed down, or there is a minimal amount of trucks in oncoming traffic, it is a good indicator that weather conditions ahead have worsened.

Most importantly, drivers should always drive only in their comfort zone. The safety of a driver and the other drivers on the road is always more important than any load that needs to meet its destination. Anytime conditions worsen to a point that the driver is out of their comfort zone or skill level it is advised to shut down and resume driving only after conditions have improved.

Paul R Woodward
President
Bains & Woodward Insurance Services, Inc.
Tow Truck Insurance
Towing Insurance
Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Paul_R_Woodward/674337

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5747329

Photo by adrian on Unsplash



Photo by:

Sunday, November 10, 2019

Commercial Driver License Handbook - California

State of California Department of Motor Vehicles logo

The California Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Program was enacted in the interest of improving traffic safety on our roadways. As a result, California has developed licensing and testing requirements for drivers of commercial vehicles which equals or exceeds federal standards.


It takes special skills and a professional attitude to safely operate large trucks and buses. Only professional drivers will receive and keep a Commercial Driver License (CDL). A CDL is proof of your professional skills and aptitude.

Download the CDL Handbook or any other of DMV’s publications that may be helpful here:

https://www.dmv.ca.gov/portal/dmv/detail/pubs/pubs


Thursday, November 7, 2019

The specific application needs of vocational truck suspensions

Kenworth_DrainBro_Dump-2-from-SAF-HOLLAND


The first question you need to ask when spec’ing trucking equipment is a simple one: What’s it going to be doing? Understanding the application and what’s necessary for the equipment to perform properly is the most important thing to know before making any purchasing decision.

Take vocational suspensions, for example. They have different needs than over-the-road suspensions because they will be tackling different jobs, and so there are a few application factors unique to vocational suspensions that fleet managers will need to keep in mind.

To start with, there are three different types of suspensions: air ride, leaf spring and walking beam.
Of the three, market share in the vocational space is divided between air ride and walking beam, dependent on the particular target segment. Many fleets tackling severe-duty applications might prefer a walking beam suspension, for instance, while other vocational segments will prioritize driver comfort and spec an air ride suspension.

Peter Schimunek, marketing segment manager for Western Star Trucks, says that many vocational fleets will choose air ride suspensions because of the stability and cushioning that they offer, which reduces freight damage and driver fatigue. However, he notes, “some air suspension models are best suited for highway applications, so we recommend adhering to manufacturer recommendations for your specific application and weight carrying capacity.”

Of course, “vocational” is a wide umbrella that covers quite a few different types of trucks, and suspension needs will be different for each of them.

“Capacity, stability, ride quality and durability are some of the main considerations when spec’ing a suspension system for a vocational truck,” says Kurt Swihart, Kenworth’s marketing director. “Vocations with a high center of gravity, such as mixers and dump trucks, require suspensions that provide maximum roll stability. In these applications, we typically recommend a walking beam style suspension system. Air suspensions are recommended when ride quality is one of the most important considerations. While air suspensions don’t typically have the same stability as beam style suspensions, there are several air suspension offerings that are specifically designed for vocational applications.”

“The needs of the vocational market are very specialized, and each application focuses on a different aspect of the suspension as the primary requirement,” says Sean Whitfield, director of marketing for Hendrickson.
For example, he notes that the key attributes needed for a suspension in concrete mixer and refuse applications are that it has the ability to maximize carrying capacity while still preserving stability and that it provides lower maintenance costs.

“Weight is an important factor when spec’ing a concrete mixer,” Western Star’s Schimunek notes. “The lighter the truck, the more concrete you can haul, which affects productivity. Choosing the right rear suspension for the job may also result in additional weight savings. However, mixers can get into some rough jobsites, so be sure to spec a suspension with good articulation, ride quality and durability.

“Chassis height is also an important factor as the mixer body must be able to fit beneath the hopper,” he adds. “A lower frame height results in a lower center of gravity, which provides increased vehicle stability. Customers should work closely with their dealer to spec the right suspension for their specific job demands.”

As for dump and crane trucks, Hendrickson’s Whitfield says that loaded stability and empty ride performance must be paired together to survive the terrain and loading cycle of these applications.
“When the vehicle is empty and/or traveling on-road, the equipment and driver must be protected from excessive road inputs,” he says. “When the truck is on-site and either being loaded or being used to lift a load, it must be supported by a suspension with high roll stability.”

Lastly, in heavy-haul applications, Whitfield says that equipment protection and ride quality are crucial to help ensure safe transport of cargo and driver. This, he says, must be done without sacrificing durability and roll stability, demanding a true vocational suspension, and he mentions Hendrickson’s Primaax EX as an example.

Additionally, there are some factors that apply across the board for vocational suspensions, regardless of the vocation.

“Vehicle weight, axle capacity, loaded and empty CG height, creep rating, and the operating environment are important application factors to consider,” says Bryan Redeker, powered vehicle systems product manager for SAF-Holland. “These factors are equally important regardless of the type of vehicle.”

Redeker says that it is important to know if outriggers will be present and where they are on the truck, as they may play a role in packaging. It’s also important, he mentions, to know whether there will be lift axles on the truck, how many, and how they will impact loading of the suspension when they are up or down. Additionally, frame rail spacing and package size of the lift axle assembly should be considered, he added.

 Suspension

 SAF-NEWAY-ADZ-Tandem

With specific application considerations for equipment come specific maintenance considerations, and you’ll need to keep them in mind, especially those that are unique to vocational segments.
“Maintenance of vocational suspensions is similar to other suspensions—visual inspection of components and bushings. For those vocational suspensions installed with U-bolts, follow the OEM recommended practices for checking torque,” Kenworth’s Swihart says.

“A key to maintaining a vocational suspension is following proper inspection intervals,” Hendrickson’s Whitfield says. “For these applications, inspections should follow the vehicle OEM and suspension manufacturer’s service instructions, which usually list recommended inspection intervals based on hours and/or miles of operation.”

According to Whitfield, some essential items to check for, especially on vocational suspensions, include potential signs of overloading such as bent or cracked steel components.

“Reviewing the transverse torque rod (TVTR) bushing wear and replacing the TVTR when necessary is particularly important in vocational suspensions,” he adds. “The transverse torque rod keeps the axle aligned laterally on rubber-based suspensions and plays a large factor in supporting the other suspension components. Once that torque rod is fully worn, it is important that it is replaced in order to properly maintain the suspension as a whole.”

SAF-Holland’s Redeker says that it is important to monitor bushings, shock, air springs and fastener torque per the routine maintenance schedule.

“These components are always important to check, regardless of the application,” he notes, while adding, “A fleet operating in severe vocational applications may wish to increase the frequency of checks. Performing the initial 5,000 mile (100 hour) re-torque is critical to suspension longevity—especially the pivot bolt connection.”

Source: Fleet Equipment by

Alex Crissey

Monday, November 4, 2019

Onsite Roadside Repair By North Bay Truck Center


Northbay Truck Center, centrally located in Fairfield CA can come to your site on the road or in your yard to take care of many repairs. Our vans are equipped with a knowledgeable mechanic, a full complement of tools, and many common parts for quick roadside repairs. North Bay Truck Center also has a vast inventory of truck parts and can even make custom hoses, and many exhaust parts. See more at https://northbaytruckcenter.com

Call us at:  (707) 427-1386

Friday, November 1, 2019

Introduction - Driver Training for On-Highway Heavy-Duty Truck Engines


Driver Training for On-Highway Heavy-Duty Truck Engines – Part 1 of 13 in a series of chapters from the Cummins On-Highway Heavy-Duty Truck Engine Driver Training Video Series updated in 2015. This segment is the Introduction to the video series.

Tuesday, October 29, 2019

The #1 and #2 Causes of Truck Breakdowns

Our Solutions:

#1 Tires: 



Michelin
Continental
General tire
RoadLux
Bandag
Triangle


#2 Brakes

BRAKE DRUMS & ROTORS
Durabrake
Gunite
Webb
Raybestos
Motorcraft
Centrifuse
KIC
Meritor
Delco
Automann

NORTH BAY
Truck Center
Home of
A&T Road Service
1245 Illinois Street
Fairfield, CA 94533
707-427-1386

Hours:
Monday-Friday
7:30am to 5:30pm
Saturday
8:00am to 5:00pm

Saturday, October 26, 2019

A&T Towing Services - for the Sacramento region and the capability to tow across the country






North Bay Truck Center and A&T Road Service have added heavy duty towing to our overall list of services. We searched for the most flexible and useful rigs to tow the biggest trucks on the road, along with big buses, and large RV units. See some detail below about our latest truck additions.

Our normal service area covers the best part of the bay area and Sacramento region; however, we now have capability to tow across the country if needed. Our A&T Road Service has expanded so much that we had to add towing to make it even more effective and timely.




Our website: https://www.truckmobilerepair.com/towing-services

Need a tow? Call 1-800-434-1205

Wednesday, October 23, 2019

Charging Stations are Coming | Electric Vehicles | Ford


Charging your car is as routine as any part of your routine. Ford electric vehicles are coming.* 

*Available only at your Ford EV-Certified dealer.

Sunday, October 20, 2019

How to perform a Class A CDL Pre-Trip inspection.



Jeff from Apex CDL Institute demonstrates how to perform a proper pre-trip inspection on a Class A tractor trailer. Remember, your states examiners might require a slightly different procedure. The process we use is good for both Kansas and Missouri and will pass easily in most states.

Thursday, October 17, 2019

Mobile Truck Repair Brainstorming To Help Breakdowns

Has this ever happened to you? You are en-route on a delivery and you get a tire blow out! I recall being downtown Winnipeg in the summer of 2004 just about half way through what ended up a 19 hour day. The great thing about Winnipeg is no matter where you are in the city, even in the winter time, you are not far from a mobile truck repair response.

What should you do when your truck breaks down? Stay with your vehicle if at all possible and make sure you focus on safety first. Don't get out of your truck if you are in traffic. Use your smart phone to find your location if you are unfamiliar with Winnipeg, search for 'mobile truck shop'. Technology is great.

There are several resources you can tap into depending on what equipment you have on the side of the road, or maybe you are stranded on Broadway in rush hour. With a laptop or smart phone you can go to TruckDown.com or just Google your location and the words 'mobile truck repair', this site is good not only in Winnipeg but all of north America.

How much can you expect to pay for a mobile heavy truck service call? Well, depending on what you need, the time of day, holiday, and so on, you can expect to pay $150 to $250 for a heavy truck service call in Winnipeg for the first 2 hours. Small trucks could cost less. A tow within the city can run you $150 to $400 or higher if you got your rig stuck in the rubbish.

How can you fix your own truck when it breaks down? Considering that there can be a thousand problems, and some tools may be too big and expensive to carry you best make notes on paper each time you get something fixed. Having a maintenance log will help, and buying tools are you need them will help reduce your truck maintenance bills.

Getting to know and trust several heavy truck shops along your route or in the Winnipeg area is key to having reliable fleet maintenance wherever you are.

Written by Darren Chabluk for WinnipegTruckRepair.com

Visit [http://WinnipegTruckRepair.com] to see a growing list

of trucking tips and our shop of the month. Call (204) 272-3954

for mobile truck repairs in Winnipeg and ask for Phil at RamWinn.

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Darren_Chabluk/921613

By   

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5847519

Friday, October 11, 2019

1948 Chevrolet 515 Holmes

1948Chevrolet

This is a 1948 COE Chevrolet Truck with a Holmes 515 bed mounted on the back. Peter Aspesi purchased this truck in 1996 from Gannon Chevrolet in Westboro, Massachusetts. It was the first Holmes 515 in the area and Peter did a complete restoration and finished the truck in 2000. Warren Roosevelt purchased the truck from Peter in 2005 after displaying the unit at an ATHS Truck show in Syracuse, New York. Just another great addition to our museum family!

Tuesday, October 8, 2019

A&T Road Service -Who We Are!


A&T "Mobile" Heavy Duty Truck and Trailer Road Service is a 24-hour, 7-days a week roadside mobile truck repair service for light and medium-duty to heavy duty commercial trucks and trailers. At A&T "Mobile" Truck Road Service we like to think of ourselves as the "Ambulance Service for Trucks." If your truck is broken down, we will come to you and perform the necessary triage to get you back on the road. Now includes towing, load adjustments, and more. Not only do we provide 24 Hour Emergency service, we could come out and do light mechanical work on site to our customer's fleet and avoid the truck having to come in the shop.


A&T “Mobile" Truck Road Service will go just about anywhere for anything, at any time. At A&T “Mobile" Truck Road Service we like to think of ourselves as the “Ambulance Service for Trucks." If your truck is broken down, we will come to you and perform the necessary triage to get you back on the road. A&T now includes towing, load adjustments, and more.
Below is a map that indicates our approximate service area. Our goal is to get to you within 1.3 hours and most often, on a clean run, we can be there in just under an hour. Although we have sometimes gone further than this circle–and we will still–this approximate 50-60 mile radius from our home base in Fairfield, CA is what we call our call area.

Of course, most of our calls are probably within 25 miles and we get there even sooner, but rest assured that we will do everything within our power to be there as quickly as possible because when your truck is down, time is very important.

Saturday, October 5, 2019

Official 2019 SEMA Show Exhibitor Video


Domestic and international manufacturers find value in exhibiting at the trade-only SEMA to Increase awareness of their businesses, generate leads for future orders, see existing customers, network with others in the industry and introduce new products.

Wednesday, October 2, 2019

Thursday, September 26, 2019

Tire Maintenance: It’s Not Just Checking Tire Pressure


This truck demonstrates uneven treads on dual tires. Photo by Les Smart.


You have built a $3 to $30 million business over one or more generations, and you are making an appropriate profit most years. Do you think about liability? I bet you do, but do you relate that to tire failures and more specifically to catastrophic tire failures? What happens to your business if a worn, damaged tire fails at speed — it doesn’t even have to be high speed — and your driver loses control of your fleet vehicle and it plows into another vehicle?

If one or more of the occupants is a young to middle-aged passenger, especially a working mother or father, your liability skyrockets. I like to call this the $5 million accident. You don’t want to lose your business in the event of one of these failures just because you were lax in making sure that your tires were in good condition. Let’s see what you can do to avoid this type of situation where your tires are concerned.

learn more at: http://www.worktruckonline.com/channel/safety-accident-management/article/story/2017/11/tire-maintenance-it-s-not-just-checking-tire-pressure.aspx


Monday, September 23, 2019

GTA 5 Real Life Mod #160 Two Heavy Duty Tow Truck Wreckers Flips A Overturned Semi Truck & Trailer


GTA 5 Real Life Mod Peterbilt & Kenworth Heavy Duty Tow Truck Wreckers Responds To A Flipped Over Semi Truck & Trailer Falling Into Water. We use both wreckers to recover and tow the Kenworth semi truck & trailer and get them towed to garage at Ace Towing.

Friday, September 20, 2019

5 Tire Tips For A Safer Work Truck

 Work Truck Tires

Tires withstand severe environments throughout their life on a work truck. Holding up to heavy loads and traveling on a multitude of surfaces are common for work truck tires. Most of us give the tires on our work truck little thought until they are in need of replacement. While this strategy may have worked for you in the past, neglecting to regularly check the condition of your tires will eventually catch up to you and leave you stranded on the side of the road. If your truck is down, your work is down. Utilize these tips to keep your work truck off the shoulder.

1. Tread Depth

Check tread depth often utilizing the penny test (a minimum of 2/32” of tread left on the tire). Most make the mistake of checking one spot on each tire, to ensure even wear check at least three spots on each tire.
2. Tire Pressure

Keep a tire pressure gauge in each work truck and check the pressure regularly. Keep the tire pressure within the vehicle’s recommended PSI range.
3. Cracks, Checks & More

Check for cracks, punctures, tears, bulges, bumps or tread separation. If you come across any exposed strands of metal or fabric, take the truck out of the field and have the tire(s) replaced as soon as possible.
4. Alignment

Keep proper alignment of your work truck tires. If they are improperly aligned it will result in premature wear and tear on the tires.
5. Overloading

Don’t overload! Your work truck (and tires) are only rated to handle so much weight. Overloading can create a recipe for disaster on not just your tires but your entire vehicle.


Source: https://www.knapheide.com/news/blog/2018/05/5-tire-tips-for-a-safer-work-truck


Tuesday, September 17, 2019

Winter Maintenance and Towing Tips for Fleets

Preparing for winter: is your fleet ready?

truck driving in winter weather
According to the U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration, more than 70 percent of roads in the U.S. are located in regions that typically receive more than five inches of annual snowfall. With many commercial fleets using these snow-prone routes on a regular basis, preparing vehicles and drivers for winter conditions is a task most companies need to address.
Read More >

Saturday, September 14, 2019

5 Steps To Buying A Big Rig


When you decide to buy a truck there are some simple steps you can take to be sure you get the best bang for your buck. If you go into a truck purchase blindly, you are likely to pay too much and get much less than you hoped for.

1. Shop Around.

Truck dealers can only advertise in their own region. A truck dealership in Ohio is not allowed to advertise in California. But dealerships are allowed to sell trucks to customers in other regions if the customer contacts them. As you travel, grab some truck papers from different regions of the country and consider contacting dealers that are far from you. If you already know what make of truck you want, call around to dealers around the country.

2. Compare Apples to Apples.

If you are going to be ordering a new truck, ask for a price quote along with the specifications- this will be about 10 pages long. Compare the spec sheets from different dealers line for line. You may find that a salesman who gives you a lower price quote also skimped out on some of the options without mentioning that to you. If you find that a salesman's quote has inferior specs, tell them which ones you want changed and have them resend the specs and quote. ALWAYS read through the specs line by line- don't trust anything verbal. You may have to pay a chunk of change to receive the faxes from all these dealers, but at least you'll know you're comparing prices, not options.

3. Prioritize

If you are shopping for a used truck, it's unlikely that you will be able to find two trucks that are exactly alike. You won't be able to compare apples to apples like you would if you were buying a new truck. Make a list of the specifications that are most important to you. What make and model are you looking for? How old and roughly how many miles? What engine do you want? What transmission? What rears? Once you nail down those requirements, you may have to compromise on some of the options. Power windows, gauge packages, color. Most options can be changed if they are not to your liking. The things that matter most are the things that are permanent, but you will want to consider the less important options once you have narrowed it down to a few trucks.

4. Get a loan from your own bank.

If you have the dealership set up financing, they are likely to add "points" to your interest rate. There is nothing unethical about this- you are, after all, using their resources to secure financing and they should be compensated for the work their employees do. But you need to decide if you are willing to pay the difference over the life of the loan. The bank may give you a 10% interest rate, but the dealer sets it up for 12% and will pocket the difference with each payment you make. Generally, the dealer will not disclose this information. However, you need to be aware that you may be able to secure a lower interest rate on your own. Consider- a difference of 3% will save you hundreds of dollars each month. It's worth it to do the extra legwork on your own.

5. Make sure you can afford the truck.

There are a lot of owner-operator contracts out there. There are many more mediocre owner-operator contracts than there are lucrative ones. Before you take on the risks involved with owning a truck, make sure you have a contract that can pay for it. Will you be pouring every dime you make back into the truck? Calculate the costs of fuel and maintenance and taxes. If you are a company driver, spend a few months putting your records on paper. Look at the bottom line- what will you have left after all your expenses? If you are not yet a driver, you will want to spend a couple of years driving a truck as a company driver before you decide to buy a truck on your own. Don't buy the lie that owner-operators with rates twice as high as company drivers are making twice as much. They may not even be making the same amount once you figure in all the expenses.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Suzanne_Roquemore

Wednesday, September 11, 2019

Cummins History: 1931 Coast-to-Coast with Clessie Cummins



Determined to top a coast-to-coast record held by GM's gas engine, Clessie Cummins set out with a diesel-powered cargo truck on a route from New York City to Los Angeles in August 1931.

Sunday, September 8, 2019

7 Tips for Sharing the Road with Semi-trucks

Vehicles and semi-trucks driving on an interstate

Driving near large trucks

Did you know 75 percent of commercial vehicle accidents are caused by drivers in passenger cars? While actions like distracted driving certainly play a role in some of these cases, there are likely multiple occasions that happen simply because drivers don’t understand how to safely maneuver around large vehicles.
Though sharing the road with semis is a daily task, not all motorists understand the limitations of a semi — mainly wide turning radiuses, slow stopping times and large blind spots. To help educate the general public on safe driving techniques, the American Trucking Associations (ATA) started a highway safety program called Share the Road. Using some of the ATA tips and our own, we’ve compiled a list of driving habits that will help make the road a safer place.

Seven tips for motorists sharing roads with semis

Roadway safety is the responsibility of all drivers, but you can take certain steps to ensure you’re doing your part. When driving near or around a semi-truck, be sure to:
  1. Drive defensively
    Operating a vehicle probably comes second nature to you. But, no matter how comfortable or skilled you are behind the wheel, it’s important to remain alert at all times — especially around large trucks. Semis are bigger in size and weight, making them slower to react to avoid collisions. Pay attention to vehicle locations, traffic flow, vehicle signals and weather so you can anticipate problems and have plenty of time to safely change course if necessary.
     
  2. Keep a safe distance
    Driving close to a semi puts you at greater risk for being hurt by sudden stops, tire blowouts or roll overs caused by strong wind. So, whether you’re behind, in front or beside a large truck, leave plenty of space for merging, swerving and maneuvering. It’s best practice to keep at least a four-second following distance between you and the trailer in case of a sudden stop.
  1. Avoid blind spots
    The right side of a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) is the largest blind spot for a truck driver — sometimes blocking their view for three or more lanes. Other areas of concern include directly in front of the cab, behind the trailer and certain zones along the driver’s side. Avoid spending time in these zones to ensure the driver can see you.
     
  2. Pass quickly
    Passenger vehicles typically travel faster than semis, so it’s not unusual to pass a lot of trucks along your route. Practice safe passing by driving closer to the shoulder rather than the truck, and speeding up instead of lingering.
     
  3. Don’t cut a large truck off
    Semis have much longer stopping distances — up to two football fields when traveling 65 mph. To prevent a rear-end collision, make sure you can see the entire front end of the truck before merging in front of it.
     
  4. Dim the bright lights
    When traveling near or past a semi, make sure your bright headlights are dimmed. Bright lights reflecting off large truck mirrors can cause two seconds or more of temporary blindness when traveling at 55 mph. The general rule of thumb is to lower your bright lights when you’re one block (or closer) behind a semi.
     
  5. Always signal
    As mentioned, trucks require more time to react to motorists stopping, turning or merging lanes. Because of this, it’s important to signal the driver at least three seconds or more before upcoming changes. This timing allows the truck driver to slow down or move over.

Thursday, September 5, 2019

Avoiding brake-related CSA citations



The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s CSA violations should be an unnecessary problem, especially since they can lead to costly delays, and unexpected downtime may cause fleets to lose customers not only because of delays.

Monday, September 2, 2019

The Need for Truck Scales

It's no secret that most of America's goods are transported by truck. Because of this, states have enacted various laws and taxes to regulate the industry. Each state has its own laws on how much a truck can weigh when transporting goods. A common standard for the weight allowed is 34,000 pounds or 15,400 kilograms. The amount of weight carried per axle is called axle weight. The gross weight is the total of all the axles of the truck. Most states receive taxes from the truck weigh stations, which goes to improving the roadways. Trucks that are overweight are subject to heavy fines, which is why there are many high quality truck scales available for companies and contractors.

Truck scales are made out of concrete and steel. They are built to handle a large amount of weight each day all year long. The scales can handle up to 80,000 pounds or 36,000 kilograms per load. The weight is calculated by sensors that receive signals from a junction box. Strain gauges, which are wires are embedded in the concrete and have an electrical current running through them. These wires will compress when pressure from the weight of the truck is sensed. The weight is then displayed on a monitor in a booth where the attendant records the weight. It is vital that these systems are reliable and functioning, because if they aren't it will directly affect their pocketbooks.

Another way that is used is called one-axle. In this instance the truck driver needs to place each axle on the truck scales one axel at a time. Once all the axles are weighed a total is given. This takes a lot of time out of the driver's schedule. One stop weighing is where the driver can place the truck on one large scale and the controller will give a gross weight. The one popular method of weighting trucks is when the truck is in motion. The truck doesn't have to stop at all. The sensors on the truck scales will pick up the weight and record it all while the truck is in motion.

Another reason that a company uses truck scales is because running an over loaded truck all the time would cause more wear on the truck. The engine would have to work harder which means you need to change your oil more often to accommodate for the extra stress. Tires would also wear out at a faster pace. Running an over weighted truck is a safety hazard as well as being illegal.

Fines for running an over weighted truck in some states have become much higher. Some fines ran 10 cents a pound for every pound you were over the weight limit, up to a fine of $500 per load. Those same states now are charging fines of 12 cents per pound with no limit to the amount of the fine. States are getting tired of truckers running loads that are overweight and ruining their roads and endangering other drivers. The heavy weight of the trucks does enough damage to the roadways at the normal weight. When to many over weighted trucks continually use their roads it causes repair needs to be done often. The taxes they collect go towards keeping the roads safe for all drivers. So we all have truck scales to thank for not only getting us our goods, but keeping us safe as well!

Troy writes about anything and everything interesting. Have any idea for an article? Pass it along!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Troy_Bassham/1147404

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6859351

Thursday, August 29, 2019

Newest addition to our tow fleet - A & T Road Service

The newest addition to our tow fleet is truck number 32. This is a 2014 Kenworth with a Cummins 500 hp engine and 18-speed transmission. The working end of this mighty tow vehicle is the NRC Quickswap unit with tag axle. This unique design will allow us to tow almost anything on the road. We can now lift up to 20,000 lb steering axle trucks, and also buses and large RV units. The long wheelbase and the tag axle combine to allow us to tow a wide variety of units.
In addition, this truck is well suited for short and long haul jobs. With the sleeper unit, we can tow across the country if needed, or for local jobs the sleeper will accommodate extra passengers. The unit is equipped with state of the art LED lighting to light up the are needed in the night, as well as tool, equipment and parts storage to take care of small repairs, DEF issues and much more.

Monday, August 26, 2019

Ten Keys to Safe City Driving


Ten Keys to Safe City Driving is brought to you by http://bigcitydriver.com. Written and narrated by Ken Skaggs. 

Friday, August 23, 2019

5 Benefits of Having a Truck Optimized GPS on Your Phone


If you are a trucker working hard day and night, it is essential to choose a truck optimized GPS as your navigation tool while getting behind on wheels. The fastest routes navigated by the standard GPS may cause you ending with more time and money unpredictably.

Here is the list of benefits to get a GPS navigation tool that are specially designed for truckers.

  • · To Avoid Low Clearance Or Truck-Restriction Routes
  • By using the GPS tool that is intended and designed only for truckers, it certainly helps you to avoid the non-friendly truck routes, low clearance or low bridges that could crash your truck trailer.
  • · Save Money On Fuel
  • NO more feeling headaches of searching for the best deal on fuel. There are bundle of GPS navigation tool provides you the up-to-date and accurate diesel price of nearby fuel stations.
  • · Delivery Freights on Time.

The truck specified GPS tool helps you to prevent the traffic congestions. You can plan the route to an unfamiliar destination in advance according to the live weather and traffic conditions provided.

· Save Time
No doubt, you can save your precious time in searching for the nearby Truck POI locations with the truck optimize GPS. Knowing in advance where to pull over your truck, it is definitely beneficial for you.

· Convenience
Within the GPS system, you can easily find the nearby Walmart stores with truck parking, scales, truck washes, hotels and restaurants nearby. It is the most convenience way to find places to fill your stomach and take a nap or relax your mind.

The Truckbubba app is the best companion app for truck drivers in North America. This app is integrated with several different mobile app assistants such as Truck Weigh Station App, Diesel Fuel Locator App, Truck Route Planner, Speedometer, Weather Forecast, etc.

Speedometer feature is a speed limit alert that allows you to adjust the speed limit for highways and cities respectively with no speeding violation.It will automatically warn you with vivid yellow or red value if your truck is over speeding.

Truckbubba app — Truck optimized GPS with speed limit alert is the best matching solution to ensure the safety of the truckers on the road.

Learn more at: www.truckbubba.com


Tuesday, August 20, 2019

Mighty Machines Giant Tow Trucks


Mighty Machines focuses on footage of real machines (firetrucks, airplanes, freight trains, snow plows) working. Voiceovers tell the story of how the machines work together to get work done.

Saturday, August 17, 2019

“Managing” can minimize downtime: Why trucks experience unscheduled downtime and addressing remedies

Unexpected out-of-service events, especially when they happen on the road, are always expensive—too expensive to be dismissed as being inevitable. Yet many fleets, in their busy day-to-day operations, too often fail to address how the road breakdowns that they do experience might be avoided in the future.

Dick Hyatt, president of Decisiv Inc., a provider of service relationship management software that can help minimize unscheduled downtime, said, “The traditional costs of commercial vehicle maintenance are measured in hard dollars, but while the trucking industry focuses on cost pressures and other challenges, many completely out of their control, fleets still ignore the fundamental business impacts associated with days out-of-service for service and repair events. This fundamental flaw misses the impact that this has on revenue, customer and driver retention and net profit.”

Ryder System Inc. is one fleet that has not fallen victim to neglecting the financial problems associated with unscheduled downtime. While it’s a call no one ever wants to get, Ryder’s management knows if it happens, getting a disabled truck back on the road as quickly and safely as possible is vital. The company also understands it’s important to determine exactly what caused the problem so procedures can be developed to minimize or eliminate such problems in the future.

According to Ryder, heavy-duty trucks often experience at least one emergency breakdown annually. Not only are such events disruptive, compromising delivery schedules, customer commitments and product safety; they also can be dangerous. Idle vehicles and their drivers waiting for assistance are exposed to the dangers of drivers who are distracted or traveling at high speeds.

Prevention via PMs

Based on experience with its more than 2,000 assets, Ryder found that the most frequent reasons for road breakdowns are tires, electrical system problems, brake issues and running out of fuel. It also found that regularly scheduled, thorough preventive maintenance (PM) routines can help pre-empt many such problems before they cause emergency situations.


Melvin Kirk, vice president of maintenance and quality operations at Ryder, said, “Traditionally, when a vehicle came in, we would execute the activities that were mandated by federal or state regulations or by our customer’s requirements. We now have intensified our focus around what we have started calling the perfect PM. This is essentially taking advantage of the opportunity, during each preventive maintenance routine, to execute all of the maintenance activities that might be required at that time.

“The objective of such activity is to ensure that the vehicle will run from that event to the next scheduled PM without any break in service. That means we execute everything from existing campaigns to any necessary repairs—doing more of a diagnostic evaluation of the vehicle at the time of the scheduled PM in order to prevent any unscheduled event midstream.”

Efficiency is important

Ryder looks upon a PM as an opportunity to improve the overall health of a vehicle. During time studies done in its shops, the company found that a maintenance technician, left only with his experience and a PM sheet, could walk as much as 4 mi. while working on a single vehicle.


“To correct this,” Kirk said, “we establish the most efficient flow around the vehicle to minimize all of that walk time. We now also have the parts readily available that will be needed for the scheduled routine based on historical PM data. For example, any filters that will be needed will be right at hand. As a result, our technicians can more efficiently execute a PM from a quality and a speed standpoint. That is one of the most significant advances we’ve made over the last two or three years in our maintenance routines. We’ve taken time and distance out of the exercise and improved the quality of it.”

As indicated above, Ryder data indicate that tire problems are the most frequent cause of on-the-road breakdowns. This is particularly true during the summer months. Kirk said, “We find tires represent a very important part for maintenance uptime; so in our PM routine we stress an evaluation of the health of tires.”

The fleet’s maintenance technicians will do everything from rotating to changing out tires during preventive maintenance events to minimize the chance of having any issues before the next scheduled PM from the tires or wheels. The entire wheel system is evaluated every time they see a vehicle. They record the wear on each individual tire on the vehicle and have protocols in place requiring the position of the tires be changed if there is an excessive variance between two side-by-side tires. They also look at the wear patterns of the tires all around, which could result in changing a tire or rotating it across the vehicle. Kirk said, “In our preventive maintenance routine, we also do laser measurements to ensure we have correct wheel alignment.”

Ryder Heavy Duty Truck Fleet program
Ryder is good, but no one is perfect, so if a vehicle fails on the road the fleet has established breakdown analysis teams in each one of its shops with specified roles in each one of our shops that are responsible for determining exactly what led to the problem.
Service island activity

Once a truck crosses the threshold of a Ryder facility, the first place it’s going to go is to a service island. At that island there will be a service attendant who will initiate the fueling of the vehicle. He or she will also do a prescribed inspection around the vehicle that will include lights, tires, windshield along with a visual inspection of the undercarriage etc. Kirk said, “We maintain a 12- to 17-point inspection depending on the vehicle type that comes into the service island. Every time you cross the threshold of a Ryder facility, we are going to inspect that vehicle as if we were evaluating it from the DOT standpoint, as well as a maintenance health standpoint.”

Although drivers are required to do pre- and post-trip inspections of their vehicles, Ryder does not make the assumption that either of those has been done as completely as possible nor does the company make the assumption that when a vehicle enters a Ryder facility that there hasn’t been some issue develop since its last inspection. Kirk said, “Such a policy allows us to catch many issues, for example, small fuel leakage or a light that might be out, which could draw attention during a DOT inspection standpoint or, more importantly, from a maintenance standpoint.”

Breakdown analysis and warranty

Ryder is good, but no one is perfect, so if a vehicle fails on the road the fleet has established breakdown analysis teams in each one of its shops with specified roles in each one of our shops that are responsible for determining exactly what led to the problem. Such a program has proved to be an effective method of improving the fleet’s PM and fueling station inspection programs.

Although it was not established to be so, the breakdown analysis program has also been an important contributor to effective warranty management for the fleet. Kirk said, “It forces the team to go back through the information about the event and make a forensic analysis of what happened. Was the failure related to activities we did or should have done during our PM or was it the result of a premature failure of a part? Was it possibly an engineering related issue of the vehicle itself? Once they do that, we have a fairly robust understanding of the cause of the event and if it was related to the failure of a component, which would allow us to make a warranty claim. We also share that analysis with the rest of our team members to help shorten the time required to analyze a future event.

Technology can help

Many of its customers use telematics to provide management data related to hours of service and operational safety. Ryder has taken a further step and is accessing information from the engine’s ECM via telematics on the condition of the engine itself. Kirk said, “Using this information we can alert the customer to any impending problems with the vehicle. We plan on building up, over time, more and more data that will help us better understand the on-road health of our vehicles.”

Another technology that offers fleets the possibility of addressing the causes of vehicle down time is offered by the use of service relationship management (SRM) software to measure and manage the causes, both internal and external, of service and repair events to improve vehicle uptime and availability. Decisiv Inc., a supplier of such software, has found that formal attention of vehicle’s days out of service can significantly influence a fleet’s bottom line.

Some conclusions, based on a recent survey of nine fleets attending the company’s maintenance summit, are of particular interest. These fleets averaged:

• 277 tractors;

• 9,538 revenue miles per truck per month;

• $20,695 in revenue per month ($2.17 per mile);

• 1.51 service events per month; and

• 3.19 days out of service (DOS) per month.

Using average industry financial data, Decisiv calculated that, were these fleets able to reduce days out of service by just 25%, they would achieve a monthly increase of $1,123 in revenue per tractor, a 5.5% increase in asset utilization, an increase of $685 in variable operating expense (due to increased truck utilization) and an increase of $438, or 45%, in net profit per truck. Note these are monthly figures! According to Decisiv, the use of its service relationship management software can achieve these improvements.

Unscheduled downtime can significantly deteriorate a fleet’s profits. Attention to the reasons why trucks experience time out of service and subsequent attention to eliminating those reasons can help increase a fleet’s bottom line.

Source: http://www.fleetequipmentmag.com/verizon-telematics-eld-ready-bundles/


Wednesday, August 14, 2019

FUEL SAVING TIPS FOR TRUCKS: REDUCE IDLING, SAVE ON GAS

STUDY PROVES TURNING YOUR VEHICLE OFF MINIMIZES BOTH FUEL CONSUMPTION AND CO2 EMISSIONS.

You may have heard that it takes more fuel to turn your vehicle off and back on again than it does to stay idling when stopped. One fast food chain even made a claim that it was “Greener” to use the drive-through than parking and walking in for a to-go order. With fuel costs and anti-idling laws being an essential consideration for vehicle owners and fleet managers, it’s important to know the facts.

The fact is that even for short stops, it saves fuel to turn off your vehicle. Idling for even 10 seconds produces more CO2 emissions and burns more fuel than simply turning your engine off, and restarting. This was found by a study done by Argonne National Laboratory, and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Program.

IDLING STUDY RESULTS
Engineers were tasked to study vehicles in the Argonne laboratory’s Advanced Powertrain Research Facility to determine the impacts of idling and restarting. Dynamometer tests were conducted at the facility and revealed that parking a vehicle, turning it off, and then restarting it uses less fuel and produces less CO2 than idling for just 10 seconds. In addition, the study also revealed that the fastest way to warm up a car engine is to drive the vehicle, not by idling it. Argonne found that depending on the vehicle’s size, 0.2 to 0.5 gallons of fuel per hour is used when idling.

EMBRACE ANTI-IDLING LAWS
With these findings, and as states, provinces, and countries continue to introduce climate change action plans and green initiatives focused on greenhouse gas emissions, now is the perfect time to start embracing an anti-idle mindset in day-to-day driving and work operations. And for those that use air compressors, the VMAC UNDERHOOD70 – Green Series Air Compressor integrates perfectly into environmentally-friendly and fuel-conscious operations.

UNDERHOOD70-GREEN SERIES AIR COMPRESSOR
The VMAC UNDERHOOD70 – Green Series Air Compressor produces up to 70 CFM at 100% duty cycle. This powerful rotary screw air compressor is installed under the hood of the work truck and its throttle control automatically adjusts truck engine idle speed just enough to match air demand, which reduces fuel consumption. What’s more, the easy-to-use VMAC intelligent digital controls also cut down on idling, as the control system shuts the truck off when air isn’t being used, and then automatically turns the truck back on when air is needed. This reduces fuel consumption and emissions as the vehicle is not idling when tools are not in use. Learn more about the VMAC UNDERHOOD70 – Green Series Air Compressor.

VEHICLE IDLING STUDY CONCLUSION
Going back to the fast food chain’s claim, no, it is not greener to use the drive-through than it is to park and pick up your order inside the restaurant. Here are the facts:

  • Idling for more than 10 seconds burns more fuel, and produces more C02 emissions than turning the engine on and off
  • Idling for an hour uses 0.2 to 0.5 gallons of fuel, depending on the vehicle, and fuel consumption increases as idling speed increases
  • Warming up a vehicle by driving is more effective than idling

Consider these findings next time you find yourself idling your truck, whether working on a job site, picking up a food order, or warming up your truck this winter. And when planning to purchase a new air compressor, consider the VMAC UNDERHOOD70 – Green Series Air Compressor.

Source and learn more at: https://www.vmacair.com/blog/


Related blogs: Going Green with VMAC: Lightweight & Fuel Saving Air Compressors