Wednesday, June 12, 2019

Ford Service Advice: Do I Need an Oil Change? | Service Advice | Ford


This helpful video will explain why it’s important to keep up with regular oil changes to help ensure your vehicle lasts a long time.

Sunday, June 9, 2019

Fleet Safety and Driver Monitoring

Deploying Fleet Safety: Saving Costs, Saving Lives.

Driver behavior contributes to over 90 percent of the crashes that kill tens of thousands of people and cost billions of dollars annually. Improving fleet safety involves more than simple driver monitoring and reactive policy measures—it requires a proactive solution to verbally coach drivers in real-time to develop safer driving habits.
ORBCOMM technology is squarely focused on the driver, and offers the only real-time fleet safety solution that detects unsafe driver behavior and offers verbal coaching before a crash or fineable offense occurs.
Improve Fleet Safety with Verbal Driver Coaching
  • In-cab Verbal Coaching: Send automated in-cab verbal alerts in real-time when drivers are speeding or driving aggressively.
  • Speed-by-Street™: Send automated verbal alerts when drivers exceed the speed limit on any given road segment.
  • Lane Departure & Collision Avoidance: Alert drivers in real-time if they drift outside their lane or get too close to other vehicles.
Keep Drivers Safe and in View
  • Seat Belt Use Alerts: Ensure drivers are wearing a seat belt by sending alerts to drivers and managers.
  • Crash & Roll Over Detection: Receive instant notification via phone, text or e-mail when a vehicle has been in a crash.
  • Road Hazard Awareness: Allow drivers to communicate with each other regarding hazardous areas including debris, construction and severe weather conditions.
  • Emergency Call/Panic Button: Call for help via hands-free cell network communication with a single push of a button.
  • Signal Jamming Detection: Help prevent hijacking by detecting the use of GPS and GSM jammers. Track stolen vehicles via GPS.
Monitor Drivers for Enhanced Fleet Performance
  • Automated Exception Alerts: Receive instant notifications via text, e-mail or phone call when a driver commits a serious violation.
  • Driver/Vehicle Inspection Reports (DVIR): Create fully customizable vehicle inspection checklists for operators to complete electronically.
  • Driver/Fleet Scoring: Automate driver/fleet scorecards to identify safe drivers and those in need of additional training.
  • Work Alone Timer: Allow drivers to set up timers warning management if they do not return to the vehicle within a given time frame.
  • Vehicle Inspection Alerts: Send timed checklist alerts to remind drivers of pre/post-trip instructions and inspection requirements.


Thursday, June 6, 2019

Ford Service Advice: Do I Need New Tires? | Service Advice | Ford



This video will explain the importance of having proper tread on your tires to ensure safety, performance, and handling, how to check tread depth, as well as key signs that you may need to replace your tires. Learn more about Ford Service Advice here: http://ford.to/FordOwner

Monday, June 3, 2019

How to perform a Class A CDL Pre-Trip inspection.



Jeff from Apex CDL Institute demonstrates how to perform a proper pre-trip inspection on a Class A tractor trailer. Remember, your states examiners might require a slightly different procedure. The process we use is good for both Kansas and Missouri and will pass easily in most states.

Friday, May 31, 2019

5 Tips to Increase Fuel Economy

 Increase Fuel Economy

When budgeting for expenses, there are a lot of things that fall outside of your control. For the most part, fuel can be one of those things that’s generally “just a cost of doing business.” However, there are a lot of things you can consider to reduce, or mitigate as much as possible, fuel costs on the job. Check out these five things to consider.

Idle Time

Idling your work truck on the jobsite has become a fairly common practice, and sometimes it’s necessary. At times, things like inverters, power takeoffs, air compressors, and more require the engine to be cranking in order to work. However, don’t let the necessity to idle for those functions become a common occurrence of convenience when it isn’t needed. You’d be surprised how quickly cutting those idle minutes can add up over the span of months or years.

Vehicle Maintenance

For a glut of reasons, you should be properly maintaining your work trucks. But one added benefit to regular maintenance is increased fuel economy. Regular fluid changes, changing filters, and routine engine tune-ups keep your truck’s powerplant optimally efficient. In addition to maintaining the powertrain, properly worn and inflated tires can make a big difference in fuel efficiency.

Slim down

Do you really need to carry everything and the kitchen sink from jobsite to jobsite? You don’t, and your truck will thank you for not doing so. Loading your truck with only the tools for the job at hand reduces weight, and reduced weight is a major factor in fuel economy.

Lose the Leadfoot

Your driving habits may be the number one factor in fuel efficiency. When you drive with the intention of efficiency, it shows. While it might be a slow and steady ride, your wallet will thank you later for taking it easy on the gas pedal. Planning service calls in an efficient manner can help you save time and miles. Make sure you’re not driving cross-town multiple times when a little planning could have gone a lot further.

Right Truck, Right Job

This isn’t something you can change on the fly, but our last suggestion is the make sure you’ve got a fleet that’s appropriate for your line of work. If you’re over-specing your vehicles, you’re wasting fuel. If you’re under-specing your trucks, you’re also wasting fuel. It’s vital that you put a lot of thought into having the right class of truck, truck body, and work, trailers that allow you to do your job, and do it most efficiently.

Source:  https://www.knapheide.com/news/blog/2019/01/5-tips-to-increase-fuel-economy


Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Introduction - Driver Training for On-Highway Heavy-Duty Truck Engines


Driver Training for On-Highway Heavy-Duty Truck Engines – Part 1 of 13 in a series of chapters from the Cummins On-Highway Heavy-Duty Truck Engine Driver Training Video Series updated in 2015. This segment is the Introduction to the video series.

Saturday, May 25, 2019

75 chrome shop truck show!! 2019


A quick video of us going to the 75 chrome shop truck show, saw some awesome trucks and had a great time!

Tuesday, May 21, 2019

About Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA)


History

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000, pursuant to the Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999 (49 U.S.C. 113). Formerly a part of the Federal Highway Administration, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries. Activities of the Administration contribute to ensuring safety in motor carrier operations through strong enforcement of safety regulations; targeting high-risk carriers and commercial motor vehicle drivers; improving safety information systems and commercial motor vehicle technologies; strengthening commercial motor vehicle equipment and operating standards; and increasing safety awareness. To accomplish these activities, the Administration works with Federal, State, and local enforcement agencies, the motor carrier industry, labor and safety interest groups, and others.

Activities
Commercial Drivers' Licenses
The Administration develops standards to test and license commercial motor vehicle drivers.

Data and Analysis
The Administration collects and disseminates data on motor carrier safety and directs resources to improve motor carrier safety.

Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
The Administration operates a program to improve safety performance and remove high-risk carriers from the Nation's highways.

Research and Technology
The Administration coordinates research and development to improve the safety of motor carrier operations and commercial motor vehicles and drivers.

Safety Assistance
The Administration provides States with financial assistance for roadside inspections and other commercial motor vehicle safety programs. It promotes motor vehicle and motor carrier safety.

Other Activities
The Administration supports the development of unified motor carrier safety requirements and procedures throughout North America. It participates in international technical organizations and committees to help share the best practices in motor carrier safety throughout North America and the rest of the world. It enforces regulations ensuring safe highway transportation of hazardous materials and has established a task force to identify and investigate those carriers of household goods which have exhibited a substantial pattern of consumer abuse.
Updated: Monday, March 31, 2014

Learn more at: https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov

Sunday, May 19, 2019

A & T Road Service - The Ambulance Service for Trucks.


A&T "Mobile" Heavy Duty Truck and Trailer Road Service is a 24-hour, 7-days a week roadside mobile truck repair service for light and medium-duty to heavy duty commercial trucks and trailers. At A&T "Mobile" Truck Road Service we like to think of ourselves as the "Ambulance Service for Trucks." If your truck is broken down, we will come to you and perform the necessary triage to get you back on the road. Now includes towing, load adjustments, and more. Not only do we provide 24 Hour Emergency service, we could come out and do light mechanical work on site to our customer's fleet and avoid the truck having to come in the shop.

Learn more at:  https://www.truckmobilerepair.com/


Thursday, May 16, 2019

Autonomy: Partnerships of sky and ground

What is likely to happen on the road to autonomous vehicles is partnerships between truck makers and tech companies.   

autonomous trucks

Sticking with the theme of disruption and transformation, nothing has the potential to be more disruption in the trucking industry than autonomous vehicles.

At a recent NationaLease meeting, guest speaker John Paul MacDuffie, professor at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, said that autonomy requires new hardware components and lots of AI software. Engineering talent will be one of the keys to its success along with the ability to get the system integration piece of the equation right. MacDuffie does not see technology firms jumping in to manufacture vehicles but rather, working on developing operating systems for autonomous vehicles.

We are already seeing incremental moves toward autonomy with some of the advanced driver assistance features that are available on trucks today. This includes things like collision mitigation and lane departure systems.

The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) has defined six levels of autonomy from zero (no automation) to 5 (full automation). MacDuffie believes there is a big leap in getting from Level 2 autonomy to Level 3.

Level 2, or partial automation, allows steering and acceleration and deceleration to be automated “using information about the driving environment…with the exception that the human driver perform all remaining aspects of the dynamic driving task,” according to the SAE definition. The human driver is tasked with monitoring the driving environment.

In Level 3, or conditional automation, the system monitors the driving environment while the driver will respond appropriately to a request by the system to intervene.

“Level 3 automation is particularly tricky,” MacDuffie said. How to safely transfer control from the computer to the driver, particularly in emergency situations, needs to be worked out. “[There has to be a] balancing act of providing drivers with the benefits of autonomy — like not having to pay attention — while ensuring they are ready to grab the wheel if the [vehicle] encounters something it can’t handle.”

What is likely to happen on the road to autonomous vehicles, according to MacDuffie, is partnerships between truck makers and tech companies — what he calls “partnerships of ‘sky’ and ‘ground.’”
He added, “The winning combination will succeed not just in meeting customer needs/wants, but also societal goals and expectations.”

SOURCE:  https://www.fleetowner.com/ideaxchange/autonomy-partnerships-sky-and-ground?NL=FO-02&Issue=FO-02_20190516_FO-02_185&sfvc4enews=42&cl=article_4&utm_rid=CPENT000004488230&utm_campaign=24750&utm_medium=email&elq2=f9e997d742a94887aa813eec4c80d2e2

Monday, May 13, 2019

Gas vs. Diesel: Which To Spec

Gas vs. Diesel Blog

Today’s comprehensive selection of commercial vehicle engines offers many benefits to customers.

A myriad of choices enable customers to select the engine that best fits their application without sacrificing torque, fuel efficiency, horsepower and more.

While the vast engine choices create additional value, it can also create a dilemma when it comes to properly spec’ing the engine for the intended application of the vehicle. Purchasers may be overwhelmed by the selection and consequently choose an engine that doesn’t best fit the requirements. Over spec’ing and under spec’ing are common mistakes, leading to lost efficiency, productivity or a longer return on investment period.

Within the last few years, commercial vehicle manufacturers have vastly increased engine choices. The most notable additions have been diesel engines within several Class 1 light duty pickups and gasoline engines within Class 6 and Class 7 medium duty trucks. While gasoline engines still dominate Class 1 and diesel engines make up the majority of Class 6 and Class 7, these new engine choices make the decision much more analytical than ever before.

So how do you know which engine is right for the job? There are many factors to consider as it pertains to the engine when in the market for a new commercial vehicle.

Cost
Commercial vehicles would all be perfect if cost didn’t need to be factored into the equation.

Unfortunately, the real world operates on financial constraints so unlimited funding for your next work truck just isn’t feasible. That being said, cost is a major influencer on the selection of the commercial vehicle, especially as it relates to the engine.

Acquisition costs can be substantially higher with diesel engines, stretching from $8,000 more in light duty commercial vehicles up to $12,000* in heavy duty commercial trucks. Gasoline engines offer the advantage with significantly lower acquisition costs.

Horsepower & Torque
Selecting an engine with enough horsepower and torque is vital for success with many commercial vehicles. The most common application considered for ample horsepower and torque is pulling a trailer, regardless of size. The more weight on the trailer, the more important horsepower and torque becomes. Other applications, including hauling bulk material, should also pay close attention to the horsepower and torque ratings of an engine as these vehicles are consistently hauling the maximum available payload.

While gasoline and diesel engines have similar horsepower ratings, they are vastly different with torque. Looking at a class 3 pickup, the diesel has a slight advantage in horsepower rating yet boasts a torque rating two times that of the gas engine**. Point being, if you are towing heavy loads or your application relies upon torque to get you moving a diesel will be the better fit for you.


Fuel Efficiency
Federal regulations have forced commercial vehicle manufacturers to maximize fuel efficiency within new vehicles, regardless if they contain diesel or gasoline engines. This has caused the gap of fuel efficiency between gasoline and diesel engines to shrink. Historically, diesel engines have held the advantage of fuel efficiency over gasoline engines. Today, you can expect a slight difference between most gasoline and diesel engine choices. For instance, with a light duty Class 1 pickup you can expect to see a combined fuel efficiency rating of 20 mpg with the gasoline engine and a combined fuel efficiency rating of 23 mpg with the diesel engine***.

Commercial vehicle customers should compare the price per gallon of diesel and unleaded fuel and factor in projected annual mileage to determine overall fuel costs.

PTO Provisions
Snowplows, dumps, cranes, many different applications require a power-take-off (PTO). To avoid potential compatibility issues, ensure the engine (and transmission) you select will allow for PTO installation. Many truck manufacturers offer a “PTO prep” option, making the installation of the PTO unit more seamless for the upfitter.

At one time, your only choice for PTO compatible engines were diesels. Today, many manufacturers offer gas engines that can easily accommodate a PTO unit for auxiliary equipment.

Idle Frequency
Engine idling is common within many vocations that employ commercial vehicles to get the job done. Today, many local and state regulations are in place to discourage companies from engine idling. This has led to many product developments, including stand-alone, mobile power systems that mount on the commercial vehicle. For companies that are still allowed to idle their engines on the job, there are obvious benefits associated with diesel engines.

Diesel engines idle at a lower speed and are engineered for severe duty cycles, making them the more popular choice within high-idle applications.

Maintenance
The longer the life cycle of the vehicle, the more vital engine maintenance will become. There are many considerations to be made as it pertains to maintenance including cost of replacement parts, preventative maintenance intervals, qualified technicians, warranty coverage and more.

While diesels have longer maintenance intervals and warranty coverage, there are additional components and requirements (DEF fluid) that aren’t found on gasoline engines. Diesel replacement parts tend to be more expensive and finding qualified diesel mechanics can be a challenge in certain geographic areas.

Cost leans heavily towards gasoline while torque, engine life, fuel efficiency and idle frequency favors diesel. PTO provisions and maintenance are heavily reliant upon the application. As always, be sure to have a clear understanding of the intended application of the vehicle to help ensure you make the best selection for the job at hand.

*Comparing 2016 Ford F-250 gas(6.2L) and diesel (6.7L) pickup for light duty and 2017 Ford F-750 gas (6.8L) and diesel (6.7L) cab chassis for heavy duty, prices are MSRP from ford.com.
**Comparing 2016 3500HD pickup with Vortec 6.0L V8 gas engine rated at 360 horsepower and 380 ft-lb. of torque and Duramax 6.6L V8 diesel engine rated at 397 horsepower and 765 ft-lb. of torque
***Comparing 2016 Ram 1500 2wd with a 3.6L gas engine with 2016 Ram 1500 2wd with a 3.0L diesel engine, both models with 8 speed automatic transmission. Data obtained from National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (nhtsa.gov).

Friday, May 10, 2019

Alternative Fueling Stations - Locator APP

  Alternative Fueling Stations- screenshot thumbnail

The Alternative Fueling Station Locator app helps you find fueling stations that offer electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, ethanol (E85), propane, and hydrogen.

Use your current location or enter a custom location to find the 20 closest stations within a 30-mile radius. View the stations on a map or see a list of stations ordered by distance from your location. Select your alternative fuel of choice and adjust the custom filters to fit your needs.

Select a station from the map or list to view contact info and other details:

- address, phone number, and hours of operation
- payment types accepted
- public or private access
- special services
- compression (natural gas)
- vehicle size access (natural gas)
- number and types of chargers (electric)
- blends available (biodiesel)
- blender pumps (ethanol)

The app draws information from the U.S. Department of Energy's Alternative Fuels Data Center, which houses the most comprehensive, up-to-date database of alternative fueling stations in the United States. The database contains location information for more than 25,000 alternative fueling stations throughout the country.


Learn more at: https://play.google.com/store/apps/developer?id=National+Renewable+Energy+Laboratory


Saturday, May 4, 2019

Every fleet has a common goal to significantly minimize roadside service call.


It is well documented that the No. 1 cause of roadside service calls is tires. No wonder, there are 18 tires on a typical line-haul service vehicle, more tires than any other vehicle component. You can have the best vehicle maintenance program on the planet, but once that truck leaves the terminal, a number of tire issues can occur that can lead to a roadside service call.

Tread area punctures are the top cause of air loss. A tire failure depends on the size of the puncturing object, in combination with the specific penetration location. If that nail penetrates through one of the tread grooves, chances are higher the nail will break through the tire casing, causing air loss. Tires do not normally have a sudden air loss when a vehicle picks up a puncturing object; they lose air slowly. It may take a few days to lose enough air pressure where the tire sidewalls begin excessive flexing, which generates additional heat build-up.

The tire footprint becomes longer as the tire pressure is reduced, meaning more rubber on the road—which also leads to increased heat. Heat is a tire’s worst nightmare. When a tire continues to generate excessive heat, the rubber actually begins to chemically break down, which will lead to a tire failure. The fact that someone just checked all 18 tires at the morning vehicle walk-around has no bearing on picking a up a nail five minutes down the road.

Sidewall damage/snags are another cause of tire failure. Right side or curb side trailer tires are especially prone to sidewall issues. Vehicles that turn frequently in city driving have the highest incidence of tire sidewall damage. Driver education can play a major role in reducing trailer tire sidewall damage. Drivers who have been on the road for many years will have fewer trailer tire sidewall damage issues than a new driver.

When a vehicle is pulled over for a roadside inspection, tires are high up on the inspector’s checklist. Inspectors are looking for tires with tread depth below the minimum 4/32-in. for steers and 2/32-in. for drives, trailers and dollies. They also are looking for exposed belts and/or fabric along with flat tires. By definition, a tire is flat when the measured air pressure is 50% or less of the maximum tire pressure molded onto the tire sidewall.

If any of these tire conditions are present, the vehicle is flagged as being “out-of-service.” A roadside service call is the only solution for getting the truck up and running again.

There is no excuse for a fleet to have an inspector flag its vehicle as being out-of-service because of a tire-related issue. These types of tire conditions should have been caught during the daily vehicle walk-around. Drivers must be trained to visually inspect tires, take tread depths and even measure tire pressure. It sounds like it is routine, but it’s not. Working with your tire professional on a tires 101 training class will go a long way to reduce roadside service calls.

Visual tire inspections should include running a hand over the tread and sidewall to look for signs of irregular wear and punctures. If a tire is getting close to the legal tread depth, a tread depth gauge measurement is strongly suggested. Make sure to check that the tread depth gauge measures 0 on a flat. Don’t take a measurement at a treadwear indicator location or on top of one of those stone ejectors located at the bottom of many grooves. If you do, you could be off 2/32-in. or 3/32-in.

Measuring tire pressure using a calibrated pressure gauge is very critical. Air carries the load, and tires with low air pressure will lead to excessive heat and premature tire removals. Tire gauges are simple devices, but will quickly lose accuracy. Even a new stick gauge is only accurate to +/-3 PSI brand new, out of the box.

A serious tire program, which includes comprehensive driver training regarding tires, will go a long way in reducing-tire related roadside service calls.

Learn more at: http://www.fleetequipmentmag.com/reducing-tire-related-roadside-service-calls/










Wednesday, May 1, 2019

5 Benefits of Having a Truck Optimized GPS on Your Phone


If you are a trucker working hard day and night, it is essential to choose a truck optimized GPS as your navigation tool while getting behind on wheels. The fastest routes navigated by the standard GPS may cause you ending with more time and money unpredictably.

Here is the list of benefits to get a GPS navigation tool that are specially designed for truckers.

  • · To Avoid Low Clearance Or Truck-Restriction Routes
  • By using the GPS tool that is intended and designed only for truckers, it certainly helps you to avoid the non-friendly truck routes, low clearance or low bridges that could crash your truck trailer.
  • · Save Money On Fuel
  • NO more feeling headaches of searching for the best deal on fuel. There are bundle of GPS navigation tool provides you the up-to-date and accurate diesel price of nearby fuel stations.
  • · Delivery Freights on Time.

The truck specified GPS tool helps you to prevent the traffic congestions. You can plan the route to an unfamiliar destination in advance according to the live weather and traffic conditions provided.

· Save Time
No doubt, you can save your precious time in searching for the nearby Truck POI locations with the truck optimize GPS. Knowing in advance where to pull over your truck, it is definitely beneficial for you.

· Convenience
Within the GPS system, you can easily find the nearby Walmart stores with truck parking, scales, truck washes, hotels and restaurants nearby. It is the most convenience way to find places to fill your stomach and take a nap or relax your mind.

The Truckbubba app is the best companion app for truck drivers in North America. This app is integrated with several different mobile app assistants such as Truck Weigh Station App, Diesel Fuel Locator App, Truck Route Planner, Speedometer, Weather Forecast, etc.

Speedometer feature is a speed limit alert that allows you to adjust the speed limit for highways and cities respectively with no speeding violation.It will automatically warn you with vivid yellow or red value if your truck is over speeding.

Truckbubba app — Truck optimized GPS with speed limit alert is the best matching solution to ensure the safety of the truckers on the road.

Learn more at: www.truckbubba.com


Sunday, April 28, 2019

Why does Rolling Resistance matter in the real world?

Some 13% of the power produced by the engine to move a long haul rig along a smooth road at 65 mph is “lost” due to Rolling Resistance. What is it, what causes it, and how can you help to reduce it.



What is Rolling Resistance?
Rolling Resistance is the term used for the energy required to roll a tire over a particular road surface.

It can be viewed as a Parasitic Power Loss, accounting some 13% of the total energy required to move a long haul tractor-trailer combination over a smooth road at 65 mph.

What causes Rolling Resistance?
Rolling Resistance is caused by the following factors

The deformation of the tire in the contact patch and the sidewalls as it rolls (this accounts for some 80% – 95% of Rolling Resistance – Michelin)
Aerodynamic drag of the rotating tire
Friction (microslippage) between the tread and the road surface
Rolling Resistance is also greatly impacted by condition of the road surface.

Why does it matter?
Because it is energy LOST, it is equivalent to a power loss. Power made by the engine is not fully usable, and inhibits forward movement of the vehicle.

Fuel consumption is therefore increased because of this parasitic loss.

How can you reduce Rolling Resistance?

  • Keep tires properly inflated. Properly inflated tires minimize deformation of the contact patch and side walls, and keeps energy loss to a minimum.
  • Use “green tires”, with rubber compounds and treads designed to minimize this energy loss. As much as 35 HP may be “saved” at 65 mph at 80,000 lb.
  • Use of single wide-base tires in place of dual assembly tires. Two dual tires have four sidewalls as opposed to two for a single tire, thus reducing the side wall flex and energy loss.
  • Larger diameter tires have slightly lower energy loss due to the fact that there is less bending of the tire as it enters and leaves the contact patch.



Thursday, April 25, 2019

Florida Tow Show 2019, Tow Trucks, Big Rigs, Mega Trucks and More!


Welcome to the 2019 Florida Tow Show. The towing industries largest international show held at the beautiful Hilton Hotel in Lake Buena Vista FL, near Disney and Orlando. Everything from huge expensive trucks to smaller versions. See them all right here. Enjoy and thanks for watching.

Monday, April 22, 2019

Tips for Maintaining and Driving on a Spare Tire

how to maintain a spare tire

While most drivers realize the importance of taking care of their tires, there’s one tire that usually gets overlooked – the one in your trunk.
But some people assume that because they haven’t used a spare,that it can operate like new. Accidents resulting from faulty or poorly maintained spares happen more than most drivers think. Learn how to safely drive on a spare tire, and what precautions you can take to help keep your spare in working condition.

How to safely drive on a spare tire

When you resort to driving on your spare, it’s important to know the limitations of your new tire. Remember the answers to these three questions to ensure you’re using your spare correctly:
  • How fast can you drive on a spare tire? Spares were not designed to drive at the same speed as regular tires; never let your speed exceed 50 miles an hour when you’ve got a spare on your car.
  • How far can you drive on a spare tire? As a rule, most spare tire mileage is around 50 miles. They were built only as a substitute to get you safely to a place where you can get your tire repaired.
  • How does driving on a spare affect other tires? As noted, driving on a spare is not a long-term solution. It can wear out your full-sized tires faster and, if driven for too long, can throw your car out of alignment.

Spare tire maintenance

Consumer Reports and other well-regarded sources on tire safety say that although the tire doesn’t have the same road wear as the four active tires on your vehicle, drivers need to inspect the spare regularly and replace it if the tire is over eight years old – that is unless a vehicle’s owner’s manual recommends changing the spare sooner.

Check spare tire pressure regularly

In addition to not letting your spare age in the trunk of your car, you need to make sure it’s getting plenty of air. All tires lose pressure with changes in the temperature, and your spare is no exception. It’s a good idea to check the tire pressure in your spare on a regular basis – and always before heading out on a road trip. It’s not useful to replace a flat tire with a spare when your spare’s tire pressure is also low.
One way to ensure your spare is ready to roll is to have it inspected every time you have your tires rotated. This is usually something that should be done about every 5,000 miles. Just ask your tire technician to inspect the spare and make sure it’s properly inflated and in good condition.
If your spare does have damage, it’s wiser to replace it rather than attempt to repair it. Space-saver or “donut” spare tires aren’t intended for long-term driving and can become worn much more quickly than a standard tire – particularly if they’re driven at too high a speed or for too many miles. A damaged spare isn’t likely to perform well, even after being repaired, so it’s much safer just to replace it.

Make sure your spare hasn’t been recalled

Just like full-size tires, sometimes spare tires can be defective. You can visit the National Highway Traffic Safety website to check for recalls and make sure that your spare is safe for driving.
If you need help replacing a flat with your spare, or need to fix a flat without a backup tire, Nationwide’s 24-hour emergency assistance program can provide a quick tire change. Get back on the road faster with Roadside Assistance.
If you need help replacing a flat with your spare, Nationwide’s 24-hour emergency assistance program can provide a quick tire change. Get back on the road faster with Roadside Assistance.


Source: https://blog.nationwide.com/driving-on-a-spare-tire/


Friday, April 19, 2019

121 Ways to Save Fuel: Tires

1) Buy fuel-efficient tires

Getting the right tire at the right wheel position can improve fuel economy by several percentage points.

About 13% of each gallon of fuel consumed goes solely to overcoming rolling resistance. That can vary by the load on the tire, the tread pattern and of course, inflation pressure.


“The relationship between rolling resistance and fuel consumption is about 8:1,” says Rick Phillips, senior director of sales, commercial and OTR products at Yokohama Tire. “An 8% reduction in tire rolling resistance will result in a 1% savings in fuel consumption.”

Various wheel positions have different impacts on fuel economy.

“On a tractor-trailer combination, the steer tires contribute 15-20% to fuel economy, drive tires 30-40% and trailer tires about 40-50%,” says William Estupinan, vice president of technical service for Giti Tire USA. “The first priority for a fleet interested in saving a significant amount of money is to start moving toward fuel-efficient tires for the trailer axles.”

A tight rib pattern, thinner tread — 12/32- to 20/32-inch of tread depth — and advanced compounding make today’s trailer tires very fuel-efficient.
With drive tires, traction and durability are higher on the list of priorities. But traction hasn’t really suffered in a significant way in the quest for lower rolling resistance, manufacturers say.

Learn more at: http://www.truckinginfo.com/article/story/2014/06/121-ways-to-save-fuel-tires.aspx

Tuesday, April 16, 2019

California Towing Laws that You Should Know



Towing laws are good to pay attention to, because they can help to make the difference in many cases between having your car towed and it remaining free. Because California towing laws are unique compared with many other states, it is a good idea to review these laws in particular if you plan to drive in the state. This can help to save a good amount of money, not to mention your time and effort as well. Read on for a brief overview of tow truck laws for the state of California.

Number 1 -- Private Property Laws
In the state of California, it is legal for a private property owner to have a vehicle towed on his or her property without asking for permission from the state or police. This means that your vehicle parked on someone else's property can be towed at any point in time and without any warning. This is not the case, however, with vehicles that are not properly functioning. If a car is resting on someone else's private property and has no engine, motor, wheels or other crucial parts that are required to operate it, the owner must wait for 24 hours before informing the police of his or her intent to tow the car away.

Number 2 -- Posting Laws
In public areas, signs must be posted in order for towing companies to legally tow your car away. These signs must be visible and measure at least 17 by 22 inches. If the sign is not visible clearly or smaller than that minimum size, it is likely that the towing company is committing an action known as "predatory towing", which involves attempting to illegally tow vehicles for a profit. This is an illegal activity and should be reported to the police.

Number 3 -- Fee Restrictions
California state law also prohibits towing companies from charging more than one day's worth of storage costs for a vehicle, provided that the vehicle is reclaimed within 24 hours of the initial towing. This is also put in place to help ensure that you don't have to pay more to reclaim your vehicle from a towing company than you should. If you find that you're being charged more than one day's storage for a car that you pick up within this time frame, you should report the company to the local police.

Number 4 -- Holiday Parking Restrictions
Certain holidays and other times of day are generally allowed for parking, while others are not. This means that a zone can be a tow-away zone at certain times and not at others. You'll therefore need to read the posted signs carefully in order to avoid getting a parking ticket or, in some cases, being towed. The same thing can be said of certain areas within the city as well.
For more information about how the California towing laws can affect your driving and parking experience within the state, visit a local California DMV with any additional questions you may have.

Source:  https://www.carsdirect.com/car-maintenance/three-california-towing-laws-that-you-should-know

Wednesday, April 10, 2019

2018-2019 Tow Show Schedule

 Home


April 11 – 14, 2019
Florida Tow Show®
Hilton Orlando Buena Vista Palace, Orlando, FL.
Phone: 407-296-3316
April 18 – 19, 2019
North American Repossessors Summit hosted by American Recovery Association 
Omni Mandalay Hotel at Los Colinas, Irving, TX
TBD 2019
AT Showplace Las Vegas hosted by American Towman
Southpoint Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, NV
Phone:  800-732-3869
Web: atshowplace.com
May 17 – 18, 2018 
Towers Family Retreat hosted by the American Towing & Recovery Institute
Crown Reef Resort in Myrtle Beach, SC
Contact: Wes Wilburn
Phone: (910) 747-9000
TBD 
New Hampshire Tow & Trade Show  hosted by the New Hampshire Towing Association
Hampton Beach State Park, Hampton, NH
Phone: (603) 863-4206
Web: nhtowingassociation.org
TBD 2019 
35th Annual ESTRA Tow Show hosted by Empire State Towing & Recovery Association
Charles R. Wood Park, Lake George Village, NY
Contact: Melissa Perlow
Phone: (631) 728-7752
Web: estratowshow.com
June 1, 2019
Nebraska Tow Show hosted by the Professional Towers Association of Nebraska
CHI Health Center, Omaha, NE
Contact: Dana Adamy
Phone: (402) 890-6531
June 14 – 16, 2019
Wisconsin Towing Association Tow Show
Chula Vista Resort (608-254-8366), Wisconsin Dells, WI.
Contact; WTA Office
Phone: 608-833-8200, ext. 17
July 31 – August 2, 2019
Towing & Recovery Management Summit (hosted by Tow Times)
Capital Hilton, Washington D.C.
Contact: Brenda Faulman
Phone: (407) 936-2494
August 9 – 10, 2019
Southern Tow Expo hosted by Tow Professionals
Orange Beach Convention Center, Orange Beach, AL
Contact: Darian Weaver
Phone: 205-223-4548
Web: southerntowexpo.com
TBD 2019
AT Tow Expo Dallas/Fort Worth hosted by American Towman
Phone:  800-732-3869
Web: towexpodfw.com
TBD 2019
Pacific Northwest Tow Show presented by Towing & Recovery Association of Washington
Greater Tacoma Trade and Convention Center, Tacoma, WA
Contact: Peter Lukevich
Phone: 206-492-5032
Web: pacificnorthwesttowshow.com 
TBD 2019
North Carolina Tow Truck And Trade Show 
Greensboro Coliseum, Greensboro, NC
Contact: Elaine
Phone: (919) 876-0687
Web: nctowing.org/events
Sept. 26 – 29, 2019
Midwest Regional Tow Show Hosted By Towing and Recovery Association of Ohio
Great Wolf Lodge, Mason, OH
Phone: 513-831-7469
Oct 10 – 12, 2019
Tennessee Tow Show hosted by Tennessee Tow Truck Association and Tow Times
Chattanooga Convention Center  Chattanooga, TN
Contact: Brenda Faulman (Tow Times)
Phone: (407) 936-2494
Web: tennesseetowshow.com
Nov 2019
AT Exposition hosted by American Towman
Baltimore Convention Center, Baltimore, MD
Phone:  800-732-3869
Web: atexposition.com

Sunday, April 7, 2019

The Knight Life: Episode 3 | Awesome Women in Trucking



In this episode Linda Dominy, Director of Payroll for Knight Transportation rides along with Susan Hoagland, Veteran driver at Knight Transportation. Flat Tires, Broken mud flaps, and traffic jams are a little taste of what Linda and Susan experience on this trip to Las Vegas and back.

Thursday, April 4, 2019

Godspeed Expediters Success Story | Freightliner Trucks


Learn more about lowering your Real Cost of Ownership at: https://rco.freightlinertrucks.com/on...

Les and Stacie Willis, owner/operators of Godspeed Expediters, have hauled Elvis’s guitar, lifesaving vaccines, sea turtle eggs, a priceless Picasso, and everything between. That’s why they trust only Freightliner for the job.

Watch the video to see how Freightliner Trucks helps Godspeed Expediters deliver under pressure and lower their Real Cost of Ownership

Monday, April 1, 2019

A & T BIG RIG TOWING SERVICES


North Bay Truck Center and A&T Road Service heavy duty towing.We think this is the most flexible and useful rig to tow the biggest trucks on the road, along with big buses, and large RV units.

Our normal service area covers the best part of the bay area and Sacramento region; however, we now have capability to tow across the country if needed. Our A&T Road Service has expanded so much that we had to add towing to make it even more effective and timely.

Need a tow? Call 1-800-434-1205

Friday, March 29, 2019

5 THINGS TRUCK DRIVERS SHOULD NEVER DO!



5 things truck drivers should never ever do. Dave talks about some of the things, professional truck drivers should never do! Some are just common sense although it's surprising how many truckers still do one of these things.... TEXTING AND DRIVING. Also Dave relates to some of the things truckers should not ever do, with a trucker story or two!

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

A & T Road (and Shop) Service

If we need to take it to our shop, we have a full service truck repair facility with the capability to service and repair virtually any truck or trailer.


We repair engines, axles, brakes, electrical, hydraulic, tires and wheels, trailers, air brakes and hoses, transmissions and we even do a little body repair when needed. We carry replacement parts and all the tools we need to get what ever needs fixing done as quickly and efficiently as possible. Most of the time, we can do the repairs at the site of the truck breakdown. 

But if we have to tow, at our facility, we have tens of thousands of parts, fittings, filters (we have one of the largest selections of Baldwin filters in the U.S.), brake linings, belts, hoses, brake drums, electrical parts--you name it and we probably have it and if not, we can get it very, very quickly. We have a large selection of Grote lighting products including LED. We stock a huge selection of Goodyear belts and hoses for all truck uses. Our entire business at North Bay Truck Center and A&T Road Service is fixing your truck right the first time in the minimum amount of time.

Sunday, March 24, 2019

As trucks get more complex, so does fleet maintenance

Technicians are turning to new tools and technologies to overcome these challenges and reaping dividends through predictive maintenance and less vehicle downtime. 


The growing complexity of modern trucks is driving changes at maintenance shops and for the workers who have to navigate this increasingly digital world.

“Electronics allow vehicles to have a better conversation with technicians than ever before,” said Kristy LaPage, business manager of the commercial vehicle group at Mitchell 1. “In the transition from mechanical to electronic control systems, there has also been a shift from technicians to diagnosticians. Vehicle electronics are the source of information that can become actionable, so shop solutions are evolving with this change.”

“The digital shop is not only changing inspection and maintenance practices,” said Jeff Sweet, solutions engineer at Decisiv, a provider of a service relationship management (SRM) platform. “Advancements in sensors and monitoring continue to improve fault condition filtering and help prioritize work based on fault severity.”

Photo: Noregon

A solution that simultaneously diagnoses all components is now essential as an intake tool for technicians.

Also constantly under development are the tools technicians need to service advanced electronic systems.

“A solution that simultaneously diagnoses all components is now essential as an intake tool,” stated Tim Bigwood, CEO at Noregon Systems, a provider of JPRO commercial vehicle diagnostic and monitoring solutions. “And those tools have evolved because while previously there were limited fault trees to consider based on symptoms, today’s vehicles are more complex, so the aid of a diagnostic and repair solution is a necessity.”

The increase in electronics on vehicles is allowing for real-time access to the equipment’s operating conditions and fault data, noted Renaldo Adler, industrial principal, asset maintenance, at Trimble Transportation Enterprise.

“Fleets now have access to a vast amount of diagnostic data needed to repair assets faster,” he said. “Inspections can also be improved with the use of electronic diagnostic tools, which analyze the equipment’s condition and any active faults, so maintenance departments are able to be proactive.”
Remote diagnostics

All of the original equipment manufacturers offer systems on their new trucks that provide diagnostic data. These sensor-based and telematics-driven solutions can improve maintenance efficiency and vehicle uptime.

Kenworth dealers, for example, use diagnostic data from TruckTech+ Remote Diagnostics.

“We have found it can cut the time a unit is in our shop by 30%,” said Josh Hayes, branch manager at NorCal Kenworth – San Leandro. “We’ve also found that among trucks with TruckTech+ Remote Diagnostics, we’re seeing about a 15% reduction in the number of trucks that must be towed because remote diagnostics allow us to monitor fault codes and diagnose issues to determine if a truck can be driven into the shop.”

Photo: Mack Trucks

For OEMs, part of the value of remote diagnostics systems is that the vehicle is effectively reporting its own status.

Sanjiv Khurana, general manager of digital vehicle solutions at Daimler Trucks North America, said with the Detroit “virtual technician” system, maintenance managers get real-time alerts and a plan for critical faults. When the truck arrives at the service location, the diagnostic information and fault history allow the technician to get a jump-start on the repair process.

At Peterbilt, SmartLinq remote diagnostics have been integrated with reasoning engine technology to enable more precise diagnostic information, fault code collection, and enhanced analysis by linking cascading faults.

Volvo, Mack, and Navistar also offer their own systems, aimed at reducing downtime and allowing for over-the-air software updates.

“With the increase in electronics on commercial vehicles, fleets have a better understanding of vehicle health,” said Brian Mulshine, director of customer experience for Navistar’s OnCommand Connection.

In short, the value in all of these remote diagnostics systems is that the vehicle is effectively reporting its own status to a maintenance operation.

“The key for truck fleets is to apply electronics to enable a proactive system that adds value and not cost,” said Wally Stegall, technical fellow, director at Morey Corp.

Robert Braswell, executive director of the Technology & Maintenance Council (TMC), noted that greater vehicle complexity makes preventive maintenance more of a challenge. “Until enough fleet data in the field is gathered, it makes it more difficult to optimize service and inspection schedules for new electronic systems,” he explained. “But increasing complexity can bring with it sensor-based maintenance strategies that can help with self-diagnostics.”

Source: https://www.fleetowner.com/maintenance/trucks-get-more-complex-so-does-fleet-maintenance?NL=FO-02&Issue=FO-02_20190321_FO-02_446&sfvc4enews=42&cl=article_1_b&utm_rid=CPENT000004488230&utm_campaign=23847&utm_medium=email&elq2=5bd8750c9eba4791abe0019c109758f6

Thursday, March 21, 2019

Why spring cleaning is not merely a household task: your fleet will be thankful

Why spring cleaning is not merely a household task: your fleet will be thankful

It seems, on the calendar at least, that spring 2019 will soon be here. And, as often happens, the longer the days become, the more prone we feel to change, to renew habits and to get started with the annual ritual of spring-cleaning.

It might seem to you that this task is just a household tradition with origins in a long forgotten religious custom, but the general idea can still be applied to fleet management. With this post we want you to consider spring cleaning from the fleet manager’s perspective and we’d also like to offer you a few ideas along those lines—this is the perfect opportunity to tackle aspects of your fleet that might require a bit of sprucing-up...

#1 – Spring-cleaning (literally). You probably have a process already in place whereby you have your vehicles washed and cleaned on a regular basis, though in winter they are more likely to suffer from the weather. A clean vehicle runs better, is treated better, and represents your company image better. If you haven’t done so, organize a plan to get all of your vehicles thoroughly cleaned with the help of your team. Have them check also that nothing unnecessary is stored inside the vehicle as it does not just demonstrate untidiness, but can become a hazard when the vehicle is driven.

#2 – Tidying up. Take advantage of the spring-cleaning spirit to tackle any small repair that might be needed. If there is any small thing that needs to be tidied up in the depot or in your workshop or office, then now is the time to address it. You might even find some Marie Kondo-like inspiration is good for your business in general. We don’t want to be too obsessive, but when you have a tidy, clean space, your mind functions better. When we say small repair... we are not actually referring to your vehicles, as you should already have some sort of process for regular checks that shouldn’t ignore a defect, even if minimal, for the purposes of safety and compliance.

#3 – Paperwork and spring-cleaning. This is slightly off the general theme but still related to spring-cleaning. If you are among those who rely on paper-based vehicle checks, we are not about to tell you to throw them away—you should always keep records safe for compliance purposes—but why not have a look at different methods than those which simply attract dust or use up too much physical space? If you are stuck with an ever-growing pile of paperwork, then the time has probably come to consider digital walk-around checks, and you are more than welcome to give our trial program a go.

#4 – The spring-cleaning attitude. There is nothing as dangerous as claiming that just because you have always done things in a certain way, you should continue to do so. If you want to expand your business, you should welcome innovation and outside-the-box thinking. If you are looking into new ways of doing things but have never been brave enough, or told yourself you never had the time to look into alternative methods, why not take this opportunity to tap into the very spirit of spring-cleaning by clearing out some of the stale old practices holding your business back. And if you need any pointers, we are more than happy to help.

 Source: https://www.transpoco.com/blog/why-spring-cleaning-is-not-merely-a-household-task-your-fleet-will-be-thankful?utm_campaign=SynX%20Blog&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=70863457&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_hFRvpkZb73F6c-u-yAr2xcsEatBWfRJuoDQtJtyWAbYSUQLfxdgPeLCvCaaXDggtX8DpU4ayaHwfLy0Om2aKSYVqe0Q&_hsmi=70863457

Monday, March 18, 2019

Signs of truck tire wear: What to look for and what to do next


tire-damage-generic

Managing your tire program requires looking for signs of wear or damage and properly maintaining your vehicle to help avoid issues so you get the maximum return on your investment. The development of irregular tire wear is very common on trucks of all types. Some of the common causes include alignment issues, under-inflation, overloading, suspension system issues, hub and drum non-uniformity or run out, anti-lock braking system malfunctions and improper installation.

Visual tire inspections are also very important. Drivers should look for damage to a tire’s tread and sidewall area. Tires with bulges or cuts in the sidewall should be carefully inspected and even taken out of service if necessary. Tires used in delivery or urban settings with curbs and other potential obstacles should be carefully inspected each day.

Be certain to look at the inside dual tire and between duals for rocks and other debris that can cause trouble. It is also important to inspect tires regularly for signs of uneven wear. Check for cupping or other uneven wear by running your hand over the tread and look for uneven wear on the tire edges. Edge wear and lower tread in the center of the tire can be signs of under- or over-inflation.

Cooper Tire recommends that tires are serviced by qualified and properly trained service personnel who can identify tire issues that indicate the need to remove them from service. A key resource is TMC Radial Tire Conditions Analysis Guide, a comprehensive guide which identifies more than 100 wear conditions and out-of-service conditions and indicates the necessary actions needed. This includes when to remove a tire from service and when it can be repaired. It also includes photos and causes of different types of irregular wear, which are categorized by steer, drive and trailer positions.
Steer tires, especially in long-haul service where the rate of wear is low, tend to be susceptible to river wear or erosion wear, a wavy channel along rib edges followed by major tread voids. This wear is circumferential, meaning that it starts at the edges of ribs and gradually progresses all the way around the tire on the sides of the tread ribs. Another common issue on steer tires is accelerated shoulder wear. This may be the result of too much or too little toe-in setting.


On drive tires, the most common type of irregular wear is heel/toe wear, which causes the lugs to develop a saw-tooth pattern. This tends to be most pronounced in high torque applications. In addition, drive tires in long haul applications may also develop fast wear on the inboard shoulder which can lead to earlier removal than might have been necessary otherwise. Rotating tires among the drive positions can help to minimize the effect. Another issue to be aware of is fast center wear, which can be a sign that tires are over-inflated for the load they are carrying.

SOURCE: https://www.fleetequipmentmag.com/truck-tire-wear-what-to-look-for-do-next/?eid=341566122&bid=2392091

Friday, March 15, 2019

Regular Maintenance From Len Dubois Trucking - Pretrip Trucks



Devon, the Len Dubois Trucking Maintenance Manager, show us an inspection that every truck is put through when it returns home. Regular maintenance and well maintained equipment is important for our professional operation.

 If you have any questions contact us at http://lenduboistrucking.com. Find us online at http://lenduboistrucking.com, subscribe to Len Dubois Trucking`s

Tuesday, March 12, 2019

TruckScience Axle Weight Calculator



Use the TruckScience Axle Weight Calculator to calculate axle weights, turning radius and center of gravity of a truck, with body, equipment and payload.

Saturday, March 9, 2019

EVIR® Electronic Verified Inspection Reporting

Tag, inspect and transmit - it’s that simple

Tractor / Trailer Inspection configuation

TAG – Data-encoded RFID tags are placed in each inspection zone of a vehicle or asset. In a commercial trucking environment, for example, tags are placed in inspection zones that adhere to DOT compliance requirements for pre- and post-trip inspections. Many school districts place tags at the back of a bus to ensure that drivers perform their end-of-shift check for students.

INSPECT – The individual performing the inspection must physically scan each tag on the vehicle. The tablet device must be within two inches of the point of inspection, which helps to verify that a check was performed and the vehicle is up to operating standards. EVIR acts as an electronic, verifiable log to prove that inspections are being performed accurately and consistently.




TRANSMIT – Defects or vehicle damage can be captured with Zonar's tablet device. Equipped with a 5 mega-pixel camera, drivers can easily transmit photos to give maintenance a heads-up as to what they are seeing. After the tablet is docked inside the vehicle, the inspection data is seamlessly transferred back to Zonar's web-based application, Ground Traffic Control®. Fleet managers and maintenance personnel have immediate access to the inspection data from the field, helping them to prioritize and schedule repairs.

Not just for vehicles

The EVIR system is as flexible as our customers' unique needs. While most commonly used to verify the pre- and post-trip inspection process for fleets across all industries, EVIR use spans to wherever there's a need to verify a process is being followed.

A complete solution provider

Zonar offers a full suite of smart fleet technology solutions that improve safety, decrease downtime of vehicles, reduce fuel costs, coach driver performance, and streamline back-office reporting.

Unparalleled customer service

From onboarding to installation, our U.S.-based Customer Care team makes sure that you’re set up for success. There’s a reason more than 99 percent of our customers that choose to do business with us, stay with us. More than 30 percent of our company is devoted to after-sale support, which means you can always reach a live Zonar employee—24/7/365.

Learn more at: http://zonarsystems.com/solutions/evir-electronic-verified-inspection-reporting/


Wednesday, March 6, 2019

Towing and Towing Related Services

North Bay Truck Center and A&T Road Service have added heavy duty towing to our overall list of services. We searched for the most flexible and useful rigs to tow the biggest trucks on the road, along with big buses, and large RV units. See some detail below about our latest truck additions.

Our normal service area covers the best part of the bay area and Sacramento region; however, we now have capability to tow across the country if needed. Our A&T Road Service has expanded so much that we had to add towing to make it even more effective and timely.


Included in our towing fleet is the HD Kenworth tow truck shown above, its a number 30 with the Holmes D.T.U. (Detachable Towing Unit). This proven design and technology comes from the most trusted name in the towing industry. The front legs allow the unit to be easily removed in a matter of minutes so the truck can be multi-functional for both towing or pulling trailers. It has a lifting capacity of 16,000 lbs when extended and will extend up to 113 inches past the tailboard.

Need a tow? Call 1-800-434-1205

Thursday, February 28, 2019

Large Tow Trucks | How It's Made



Large, specialized recovery units are welded, painted and then secured to a pre-built truck. The resulting rig is strong enough to tow buses and other large vehicles. | http://www.sciencechannel.com/tv-show...

Monday, February 25, 2019

A BIG TOW - 774,000 lb Transformer Superload



Beyel Brothers Crane & Rigging moved this 200 ton transformer out of Rockledge, Florida with ease. The crew shares a little of what goes into carrying out such a move.

Friday, February 22, 2019

Cummins History: 1931 Coast-to-Coast with Clessie Cummins



Determined to top a coast-to-coast record held by GM's gas engine, Clessie Cummins set out with a diesel-powered cargo truck on a route from New York City to Los Angeles in August 1931.

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Winter Weather Reminder from OSHA.

 

KANSAS CITY, MO – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reminds employers to stay vigilant when it comes to weather-related hazards that can put employees at risk when temperatures plummet in winter months.

Slippery roads and surfaces, frigid temperatures, and carbon monoxide fumes from engines, generators, and heaters are among the hazards that can lead to employee injuries and illnesses during the season. Working outdoors in excessively cold environments or without adequate protection – such as thermal clothing, gloves, and hats – can cause serious loss of surface and internal body temperature. Cold environments also increase risk factors associated with physical exertion, including dehydration, and existing health conditions.

OSHA offers winter weather resources to help protect employees from cold stress and hazards that are present when clearing heavy snow around workplaces and from rooftops, driving on icy roads, and coming across downed power lines.

Employers should perform preventative maintenance and inspect equipment before use, monitor carbon monoxide levels in workplaces, operate gas-powered equipment only in well-ventilated areas, and prevent blockages in ventilation and exhaust systems after snowfalls and when ice forms.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit https://www.osha.gov.

Saturday, February 16, 2019

Six Tips for First Time Towing


 You've just bought your first camper, horse trailer, boat or cargo hauler, and now you have to tow it from the place you bought it to where you're going to store it. Don't get caught unprepared. While towing might seem intimidating at first, the following tips, coupled with the right equipment and practice, can make you a master tower.

These are the most important issues to consider when towing:


1. Weight compatibility

The most important factor to consider when towing anything is weight compatibility — cars and trucks have specific towing weight limits. Know how much your tow rig and your trailer weighs. A simple trip to the local scales will get you started. Make sure that your tow vehicle can handle the weight you plan to tow. Follow manufacturer recommendations wherever possible. Every vehicle capable of towing will have a posted maximum tow rating. Check your owner's manual first, but manufacturer websites should also have the information.
2. Understand the language of towing

Towing has a language all its own, and you need to learn it for buying, towing and following the law in your state. There are many acronyms in trailering and most have to do with weights and capacities. Below are just some of the most important:

    Max tow rating: The largest total weight recommended by the tow vehicle maker that a particular rig can tow safely.
    Gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR): This is the total amount of weight a fully loaded truck can carry safely as determined by the manufacturer. The total number should include passengers, fluids, cargo and any applicable tongue weight.
    Gross combined weight rating (GCWR): This is the total allowable weight of a fully loaded tow vehicle and trailered vehicle that includes all tow vehicle occupants, cargo, fluids, tongue weight and accessories. One mistake often made is underestimating the total weight of your truck and trailer. Making another trip to the local scales with a fully loaded setup is recommended.
    Gross trailer weight rating (GTWR): You should be able to find this on a metal tag attached somewhere on the trailer frame. It states the maximum allowable weight of the cargo and the trailer combined.
    Gross axle weight rating (GAWR): This describes the maximum weight a single trailer axle can safely carry, independent of the rest of the rig.

3. Hitch balls are critical safety gear

The hitch ball is attached to the tow vehicle receiver hitch. Many vehicles come with a factory-installed receiver that are typically attached to the frame or reinforced section of a unibody. Higher-quality aftermarket hitches are available as well, but all should be clear about exact weight rating capabilities. The ball itself supports some trailer weight and couples the trailer with the truck or car. Trailer hitches are categorized by tongue weight, and as hitch numbers climb, so does the tongue weight it can handle.


Towing Mirrors II

Tongue weight, or the amount of weight on the vehicle's hitch, is an important issue. If your tongue weight is less than 10 percent of the weight of the fully loaded trailer, the trailer will probably sway a bit, making it difficult to control. On the other hand, if you have too much weight on the tongue (let's say more than 15 percent of total trailer load weight), your tow vehicle's rear tires can overload (and overheat) and push the rear end of the vehicle around; this makes stopping and handling curves and cornering difficult.

4. Always use safety chains

Nobody who wants to tow safely would fail to make sure the trailer and tow vehicle are attached, not only between ball and tongue, but also with strong safety chains. Experienced towers cross the chains under the trailer tongue so in case of a catastrophic separation, the trailer and the hitch are less likely to separate. Be sure there is enough chain slack to make turns, and always be sure the chains will not drag on the pavement.
5. Trailer load balance is important

Most manufacturers recommend you distribute 60 percent of the weight of the trailer load over the front half of the trailer. After you have the load balanced correctly, make sure that cargo is secured with straps or tie-downs. When cargo shifts, your load becomes unbalanced, making your trailer unstable and less predictable.
6. Driving with a trailer

At the risk of oversimplifying the point, driving with a fully loaded trailer — when done properly and safely — is not much more difficult than driving your tow vehicle empty. However, do not confuse the two as the driving techniques and vision strategies are very different. Most people tow a boat, a camper or perhaps a car trailer to a show or race.

First, use common sense. Second, when driving with a trailer, everything you do should be done at half the speed without the trailer. This means turning and stopping will take more time — so allow twice the distance for the increased mass. Also, remember to allow for your extra length when you change lanes. And, finally, be sure to watch for objects and/or situations far enough ahead of you to react with plenty of time. Look much farther ahead than normal so you'll have plenty of time to slow or change course if an unanticipated person or vehicle comes into your path.

Most experienced towers prefer pickup trucks over SUVs and full-size cars. Pickups generally have better power-to-weight ratios and more torque than cars, and extra power is needed for hauling trailers up hills and mountains. Generally speaking, full-size pickups can handle more trailer weight than a car or SUV mainly due to their stronger frame construction, but you'll need to weigh quite a few factors when deciding on the right vehicle for your needs.

For more information about towing or products you might need to do it safely, visit Curt Manufacturing.

Cars.com photos by Mark Williams



Source: http://news.pickuptrucks.com/2015/07/six-tips-for-first-time-towing.html